Friday, October 26, 2018

A look at the Willy Street Coop expansion in Middleton


Expanded check-out area
Photos by Retiring Guy

Willy West expansion

Cheese, wine, beer!

Hot bar is the center of attention

West expansion grand re-opening celebration

Meet Cesar Sayoc, registered Republican and Trump rally attendee




Reported in Arrest made in connection to suspicious packages sent to prominent Democrats, Trump critics.  (Madison.com, 10/26/2018
 
Related reading:  
Cesar Sayoc: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know.  (Heavy, 10/26/2018)

Happy Halloween blow-ups











Abraham, Martin & John, the last big hit by Dion, debuts on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending October 26, 1968



In other chart news, "Who's Making Love" made an earlier appearance on the CKLW Top 30, debuting at #22 on October 1, 1968.  It spent 5 weeks in the top 10, one of them at #1Clear-channel CKLW, 50,000 watts beaming across Lake Erie to little Warren PA 16365, was one of Retiring Guy's favorite radio stations at this time.


Related links:
How Robert Kennedy Inspired ‘Abraham, Martin and John.  (The New York Times, 6/5/2018)

Related posts:
Aretha Franklin's two-sided hit single among the newcomers on Billboard Hot 100 for the week 
ending August 17, 1968.

Iron Butterfly makes its first appearance on Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending August 24, 1968.

Big Brother and the Holding Company makes its first two appearances on Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending August 31, 1968.

Fire! The Crazy World of Arthur Brown debuts with its only single to chart on the Billboard Hot 100. ( For the week ending September 7, 1968)

The Beatles "Hey Jude" debuts in the top ten on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending September 14, 1968

Jimi Hendrix Experience: "All Along the Watchtower" debuts on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending September 21, 1968

Run for your lives, here come the Archies: Bang-shang-a-lang debuts on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending September 28, 1968

"White Room" by Cream debuts as a national breakout on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending October 5, 1968

"Ride My See-Saw" by the Moody Blues debuts on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending October 12, 1968.

"Love Child" by Diana Ross and the Supremes lead the pack of debut singles on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending October 19, 1968

Vote November 6th: Time for that 'loony' Brad Schimel to be fired


Also known at AG BS


Reported in Attorney General Brad Schimel claims defending Exxon protects Wisconsin. (Wisconsin State Journal, 10/26/2018)

Photo and italicized text credit:  Wiley Rein LLP

Other AG BS posts:
2018
In a perfect world, Brad Schimel's well-deserved run of bad press should tank his re-election chances.  (10/13/2018
Are Wisconsin voters ready to reward Attroney General Brad Schimel for his incompetence?  (9/23/2018)
Get me rewrite: Campaign committee to re-elect Brad Schimel issues rape kit testing press release 2 months before election.  (9/11/2018)
Meet Wisconsin's own flibbertigibbet, (5/12/2018)
Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, a man withoiut a shred of integrity, sez 'hooray' for voter ID and intimidation.  (4/13/20187)
UPDATE. Mexico border wall support and opposition by generation.  (Marquette Law School poll).  (3/20/2018)
ID and intimidation.   Brad Schimel gets top billing in the Attorneys General Hall of Shame.  (2/28/2018)
Fight fire with fire: Be careful what you wish for, Brad Schimel.  (2/21/2018)

2017
Still marching in the parade of GOP incompetents, Attorney General Brad Schimel.  (12/8/2017)
Wisconsin AG Brad Schimel places himself above the law.  (2/16/2017)
When WI Attorney General Brad Schimel sez "kick ass every day", what does he mean exactly?  (1/7/2017)

2016
UPDATE. So sez Scott Walker/Brad Schimel mouthpiece.  (11/3/2016)
UPDATE. Once again, it's 'mission accomplished' for proponents of voter ID.  (10/13/2016)
Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel serves up a partisan mush of GOP talking points.  (9/21/2016)
Despite recent appeals panel ruling, Brad Schimel continues to waste taxpayer money.  (8/24/2016)
Get me rewrite:  Schimel 'misspeaks' again.  (8/16/2016)
Get me rewrite:  Wisconsin is open for polluters.  (7/12/2016)
The best and the brightest: DOJ mouthpiece sez, "Fuck it, we're not doin' our jobs!".  (6/21/2016)
How corrupt is the Walker administration? Read up on 2011 Wisconsin Act 21 for the answer.  (5/11/2016)

2013
Who's Running for Wisconsin Attorney General in 2014: Waukesha County DA Brad Schimel.  (10/10/2013)

The Leahs: Trying to lie their way into the U.S. Senate



Updated: Fact checking Tammy Baldwin and Leah Vukmir, the U.S. Senate candidates.  (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 10/26/2018 updated)


More on the Leahs:
The Leahs on toast (the Brett Kavanaugh edition).  (10/11/2018)
Money can't buy the Leahs love.  (9/30/2018)
The Leahs are toast (the home base edition).  (9/18/2018)Wisconsin independent voters UPDATE: And the hits just keep on coming for Scott Walker and Leah Vukmir.  (9/4/2018)
UPDATE. Leah Vukmir all smiles receving her Iron Lady award from ALEC.  (8/23/2018

Meet the most toxic person in America



Trump, Partisan and Pugilist, Abandons Calls for Unity After Bomb Scares. (The New York Times, 10/25/2018)

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

High-visibility shelf space available soon at Woodman's



Photo by Retiring Guy, 
taken 2 months ago with the idea
that it would eventually be useful


Dear Donald, How now Dow Jones?



The Trump Bump in Stocks Is Weakening.  (The New York Times, 10/23/2018.  (Different headline
for digital edition.)
Concerns about higher interest rates, Mr. Trump’s trade policies and slower economic growth outside the United States have weighed heavily on stocks this month. The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index is down 5 percent in October and sits 5.6 percent below its record high in September.


Opened on December 7, 1967, and ran for 220 performances.  (Note who does the intro of the number.)



Harold Crecraft (1931-2018) Warren High School class of 1949



1949 Dragon yearbook

1967 Warren City Directory
  • Crecraft Aurelia Z Mrs waitress B&B Smoke Shop r200 Main av
  • Crecraft Wm H (Aurelia Z) equip opr h200 Main av 
  • Saporito Anthony (Ruth M) travels sets machs Struthers Wells h11 N Parker
1983 Warren City Directory
  • Crecraft W H h200 Main Av
  • McDunn Elaine C Mrs mach opr New Process h200 Main Av
  • McDunn James B & Elaine C; emp National Forge h200 Main Av
  • Saporito Anthony (Ruth M) retd  h11 N Parker

The popularity of Harold as a baby name is graphed here.   Let's take a look at Aurelia. 


Welcome back.  Aurelia followed a bumpy, descending road during the 1st half of the 20th century before falling out of sight in 1951.  She's covered some territory since her 2012 return.

Other class of 1949 members: 
2018
Neil de Stefano.  (1/20/2018)

2017
Margaret Hartweg Albaugh Dallenbach.  (12/21/2017)
Dorothea Giltinan Suppa.  (6/15/2017)
Ruth Bengston Thelin.  (4/27/2017)
Donna Wenzel Ponsoll.  (1/4/2017)

2016
Margaret Eustace Sutter.  (11/17/2016)
Paul Mahan.  (7/17/2016)
Paul Briggs. (7/11/2016)
Mary Ann Harrison Hughes.  (3/29/2016)
Winona Ross Prosen.  (3/5/2016)

2015
Bertie McConnell Glotz.  (9/26/2015)
Corrine Culbertson Ryan Shanshala.  (7/13/2015)
Nicholas Mangus II. (6/15/2015)
Teresa Nuhfer Sanden.  (4/13/2015)
Catherine Salapek Freeborough.  (4/10/2015)
Richard Sharp.  (3/22/2015)

2014
Richard Hamilton.  (12/17/2014)

It bears repeating: Remember when Scott Walker consulted Jeff Sessions on immigration




The Earls had a modest hit with this doo-wop ditty.  "Remember Then" debuted at #94 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending December 15, 1962.  It spent 9 weeks on the chart, peaking at #24.


Original 4/27/2015 post, "Dear Scott Walker, Admitting you consulted with Sen. Jeff Sessions on immigration is not a confidence builder, starts here.



The junior Senator from Alabama has a 94.24 lifetime rating from the American Conservative Union.

Best Friends Forever

Walker's  novel stance on immigration seen as risky.  (Wisconsin State Journal, 4/27/2015)

On the advice of the Koch Brothers?
Walker said he had talked with Alabama Republican Rep. Jeff Sessions, chairman of the Senate Judiciary’s immigration subcommittee, who had previously been a rare voice in calling for fewer legal immigrants.

The Senate's anti-immigration warrior.  (Politico, 3/15/2015)
Sessions has long been a critic not just of legalizing undocumented immigrants but also of allowing more immigrants into the United States at all — a view to which many in the GOP take exception. 

Scott Walker.  Know him by the company he keeps.

UPDATE. Oconomowoc Public Library: Annual Circulation and Program Attendance, 2009-2017





Ranked in order by percentage change in annual program attendance from  2009 to 2017, minus to plus.

Related posts:
Milwaukee Public Library.  (10/5/2018)
Waukesha Public Library.  (10/5/2018)
Kenosha Public Library.  (10/6/2018)
Neenah Public Library.  (10/6/2018)
La Crosse Public Library.  (10/6/2018)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (10/7/2018)
Middleton Public Library.  (10/8/2018)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (10/8/2018)
Racine Public Library.  (10/9/2018)
Verona Public Library.  (10/10/2018)
La Crosse County Library.  (10/13/2018)
Franklin Public Library.  (10/13/2018)
11/17/2017 update starts here.






9/5/2016 update starts here.



Source:  Wisconsin Public Library Service Data (2015 preliminary)



Original 10/10/2015 post starts here.




Statistics found at Wisconsin Public Library Service Data: 1996 - Preliminary 2014. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction)

How libraries rank




Related reading:
Libraries at the Crossroads.  (Pew Research Center, 9/15/2015)
  • Summary
    • Public wants libraries to advance education, improve digital literacy and serve key groups (bar graph()
    • The big questions:  What should happen to the books?  What should happen to the buildings?
      • Growing public support for moving some books and stacks to create space for community and tech services (line graph)
    • Large percentages of Americans see libraries as part of the educational ecosystem and as resources for promoting digital and information literacy.
    • Many believe libraries should be pathways to economic opportunity, especially when it comes to providing resources for business development, jobs search and enhancing workforce skills.
    • Many think closing their local public library would effect their communities, and a third say it would have a major impact on them and their families.
    • Civic activists are more likely to use libraries (bar graph)
    • A majority of Americans say libraries should provide services to help recent immigrants, veterans and active-duty military personnel.
    • Many view public libraries as important resources for finding health information and some conduct such services using libraries' online access resources.
    • Low-income Americans, Hispanics and African-Americans are more likely to say that libraries impact their lives and communities than other Americans.


Public Libraries and Hispanics.  (Pew Research Center, 3/17/2015)
  • From "Note on Terminology".  The terms “Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.  
  • Foreign-born Hispanics use libraries less than U.S.-born Hispanics, whites and blacks.  (bar graph)
  • Immigrant Hispanic library users rate library services highest
    • (table)
    • Hispanic immigrants see major impact of library closing on their families and their communities more than others (bar graph)
  • Public Opinion About Libraries (white, black, Hispanic)
    • Overall positive feelings about libraries (bar graph)
  • Accessing public libraries
  • Who are the Hispanic library users?
  • How Latinos consume information
  • Ease of finding information
  • Full report


Younger Americans and Public Libraries.  (Pew Research Center, 9/10/2014)
  • Summary of findings
    • There are actually three different “generations” of younger Americans with distinct book reading habits, library usage patterns, and attitudes about libraries.
    • Millennials’ lives are full of technology, but they are more likely than their elders to say that important information is not available on the internet.
    • Millennials are quite similar to their elders when it comes to the amount of book reading they do, but young adults are more likely to have read a book in the past 12 months.
    • The community and general media-use activities of younger adults are different from older adults.
    • As a group, Millennials are as likely as older adults to have used a library in the past 12 months, and more likely to have used a library website.
    • As with the general population, most younger Americans know where their local library is, but many say they are unfamiliar with all the services it may offer.
  • A Demographic Portrait of Younger America
    • Student status (table)
    • Employment (table)
    • Students' education level (table)
  • Younger Americans' Reading Habits and Technology Use
    • How often do you read a book, including print, audiobooks, and e-books?  (table)
    • Reading habits among young Americans (table)
    • Most readers say they purchase most of the books they read (table)
    • Other activities and media consumption
      • Community activities (table)
      • Entertainment and media activities (table)
    • Technology habits and views
      • Technology use and gadget ownership (with table)
    • Views about the Internet (with table)
  • Younger Americans' Relationships with Public Libraries
    • Public library use
      • Recent public library use (table)
      • Total public library use (table)
      • Visited a public library in person in the past year, over time (table)
      • Used a public library website in the past year, over time (table)
      • Frequency of library visits among Americans 16+ who visited a library in the past year (table)
      • Frequency of library website usage (table)
      • Frequency of library visits among Americans who have ever visited a library (table)
    • Experiences with libraries
      • How long have you lived in the neighborhood where you live now? (table)
      • Do you know where the closest public library is to where you live?  (table)
      • Younger Americans are less likely to know about "all or most" of the services and programs at their local public libraries (table)
      • Most describe public library's physical condition positively (table)
    • Views on the evolving role of public libraries in their communities
      • Younger age groups less likely to say their local public library's closing would have a major impact on their family or community (bar graph)
    • Importance of library services
      • How important are these public services to you and your family?  (bar graph)
      • How important are these public services to you and your family? (table)
    • Broader views about libraries
      • Younger Americans' views on public libraries' roles in their communities (bar graph)
      • Views on public libraries' roles in their communities (bar graph)
      • Views on public libraries and technology (bar graph)
      • "Public libraries are important because they promote literacy and love of reading." (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Because it provides free access to materials and resources, the public library plays an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed."  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Having a public library improves the quality of life in a community."  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Public libraries provide many services people would have a hard time finding elsewhere."  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "People do not need public libraries as much as they used to because they can find most information on their own,"  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Public libraries have not done a good job in keeping up with new technologies."  (% who strongly agree; table)

From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers -- and Beyond.  (Pew Research Center, 3/13/2014)
  • Summary of Findings
    • Broad themes and major findings
      • Public library users and proponents are not a niche group
      • Americans' library habits do not exist in a vacuum
      • Life stage and special circumstances are linked to library use and higher engagement with information
    • The spectrum of public library engagement in America
      • High engagement
        • Library Lovers (10%)
        • Information Omnivores (20%)
      • Medium engagement
        • Solid Center (30%)
        • Print Traditionalists (9%)
      • Low engagement
        • Not for Me (4%)
        • Young and Restless (7%)
        • Rooted and Roadblocked (7%)
      • Non-engagement
        • Distant Admirers (10%) 
        • Off the Grid (4%)
      • Typology snapshot:  Groups by level of engagement with public libraries (pie graph)
      • Public library engagement:  Group overviews (table)
    • Group portraits (each of 9 includes the following information)
      • Overview
      • Who they are
      • Lifestyle
      • Relationship with libraries
    • General patterns in Americans' engagement with libraries
      • Socioeconomic status
      • Parenthood
      • Ties to learning acquisition
    • Broader trends in Americans' information  habits
      • Acquiring information is often a social process in which trusted helpers matter
      • Technology use is not so much a substitute for "offline" activities as it is an enhancement tool
      • Libraries score high ease of access and use -- even among those who are not frequent users
      • There are people who have never visited a library who still have positive views of public libraries and their roles in their communities
  • High Engagement
    • High engagement groups (pie graph)
    • Library lovers visit libraries more than information omnivores (column graph)
    • Library Lovers
      • Overview
        • Library Lovers' recent public library usage (column graph)
      • Who they are
        • Gender
        • Age
        • Income and jobs
        • Education
        • Marriage and parenting
        • A demographic portrait (series of column graphs)
        • Other lifestyle notes
        • Library lovers:  Where they live (column graphs)
          • Region
          • Community type
        • Library lovers' community activities (column graph)
      • Technology and information habits
        • Library Lovers' technology profile (table)
        • Defining information traits
        • Library Lovers' information habit (column graph)
        • Library Lovers' views about.... (tables)
          • Learning new information
          • Ease of finding information
          • East of completing tasks
      • Relationship to public libraries
        • Public library use and experience
          • Library Lovers' public library usage (column graph)
          • How well-informed do you feel about the services your public library offers (column graph)
        • Public library attitudes
          • Views about public libraries in the community (table)
          • Views about public libraries and technology (table)
          • Most Library Lovers say local library's closing would have a major impact (column graph)
          • The importance of individual library services (table)
    • Information Omnivores (same general format as above)
  • Medium Engagement (same general format)
  • Low Engagement (same general format)
    • Low engagement groups vary in the view of public library (column graph)
    • Few Young and Restless know where the closest public library is to where they live (column graph()
    • Low engagement group differ in their in the perceptions of the impact of local public library's closing (column graph)
    • Few Not for Me say local library's close would have major impact on community (column graph)
    • Most Rooted and Roadblocked members have lived in their current neighborhood for at least 11 years.  (column graph)
  • Non-engagement.  (same general format)
    • Over half of those Off the Grid did not read any books in the past year (column graph)

How Americans Value Public Libraries in Their Communities.  (Pew Internet, 12/11/2013)
  • The important of public libraries to their communities 
    • If your local library closed, what impact would that have on you and your family?  On your community?  ( bar graph)
  • Though many libraries are seen as important, there are varying levels of enthusiasm for different services
    • How important are these services to you and your family?  (list of 9; bar graph)
  • Most Americans know where their local library is, but many are unfamiliar with all the services they offer
    • How well informed do you feel about the different services your public library offers? (bar graph)
  • 54% of Americans have used a library in the past 12 months and 72% live in a "library household"
  • Most Americans who have ever used a library have had positive experiences


Parents, Children, and Libraries.  (Pew Internet, 5/1/2013)

  • Part 1:  A profile of parents
    • Demographic profile of a sample of parents vs. national parameters (table)
    • Demographic profile of parents and other adults (table)
  • Part 2:  Parents and reading
    • Reading frequency for parents and other adults (table)
    • Types of books read in past 12 months differs for parents and other adults (column graph)
  • Part 3:  Parents and reading to children
    • How often parents read to children, by age of youngest child (table)
    • Characteristics of parents who read to their child every day (table)
    • Parents say reading print books is very important to their children (pie graph)
  • Part 4:  Parents and libraries
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities 
    • How important libraries are to parents
      • How important are libraries (bar graph)
      • Library use among parents and other adults (table)
      • Characteristics of parents by library patronage (table)
    • Recollection of library use by family members and experiences at libraries
      • Overall library experiences are positive for almost all Americans (bar graph)
      • Parents are more likely to have a library (bar graph)
    • Changes in library use in recent years 
      • Changes in library use (bar graph)
      • The main reasons parents' library use has increased in the past 5 years (table)
      • Frequency of library visits, parents and other adults (bar graph)
    • Activities at libraries
      • What parents do at libraries (bar graph)
      • How often people get help from library staff (bar graph)
      • How helpful was library staff (bar graph)
    • How much people know about what their library offers
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
      • How much do parents know about the different services and programs the public library offers?  (bar graph)
  • Part 5:  Parents, children and libraries
    • Parents value libraries for their children
      • Importance of libraries to parents (bar graph)
      • How important are libraries for children (bar graph)
      • Reason for importance of libraries (bar graph)
      • Parents who say each is a MAJOR reason libraries are important (table)
      • Library use by children (table)
      • Frequency of children's visits to library in past 12 months (pie graph)
      • Child's age makes a difference in how library is used (column graph)
    • Parents' experiences (focus group responses)
    • Community
    • Responsibility  (Several parents in our focus groups said that they wanted their children to use the library so that they could learn about personal responsibility, as well as how to act appropriately in public spaces.)
    • Safety
  • Part 6:  Parents and library service
    • What is important for libraries to offer
      • What parents think is important for libraries to offer (bar graph)
      • Parents who say EACH is important for libraries to offer (table)
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and program libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Parents are more likely than other adults to support a few changes to library service (bar graph)
    • The new services peoplel say they would and would not use 
      • How likely say they would be to use various library service (bar graph)
      • Parents are more likely than other adults to say they would use new library offerings (bar graph)
      • Parents of teenagers are more likely than other parents to say they would use some of these library services (column graph)
  • Part 7.  Librarians' thoughts
    • Early childhood literacy and programs for children
    • Coordinating with schools
    • Tutoring and help with schoolwork
    • E-books & tablets
    • Interactive experiences
    • On reaching parents
    • On using space in the library
    • Libraries as general information resource for parents
    • What libraries should change

Library Services in the Digital Age.  (Pew Internet, 1/22/2013)

  • Part 1:  The role of libraries in people's lives and communities
    • Family members' library use from childhood
      • Did anyone else in your family use public libraries when you were growing up?  (table)
    • Americans' library use
      • Have you ever visited a library or bookmobile in person?  (table)
      • Visited a library in-person in the last year?  (table)
      • A snapshot of Americans' library use habits (table)
    • Experiences at public libraries are positive
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities
    • How important are libraries to you and your family?
      • How important are libraries?  (bar graph)
    • Libraries' importance to the community as a whole
      • How important are libraries? (table)
  • Part 2:  What people do at libraries and library websites
    • Activities at libraries
      • (bar graph)
      • Browse the shelves for books or media
      • Borrow print books
      • Research topics that interest them
      • Get help from a librarian
      • Sit, read and study, or watch or listen to media
      • Use a research database
      • Attend or bring a younger person to a class, program, or event designed for children or teens
      • Borrow a DVD or videotape of a movie or TV show
      • Read or check out printed magazines or newspapers
      • Attend a meeting of a group
      • Attend a class, program or lecture for adults
      • Borrow or download an audiobook
      • Borrow a music CD
    • How frequently people receive assistance from library staff
      • (bar graph)
        • by race/ethnicity
        • by household income
    • Use of library websites
      • (table)
    • Changes in library use in recent years
      • The main reasons patrons' library use has changed in recent years (table)
    • Technology users and library use
      • Tech users more likely than non-tech users to say they use the library less than they used to (bar graph)
  • Part 3:  Technology use at libraries
    • Those who have used free internet and computers in their communities (table)
    • Use of computers and the internet at libraries
      • Internet use at libraries (table)
    • How important is free internet use at libraries?
      • (table)
  • Part 4:  What people want from their libraries
    • How much people know about what their libraries offer
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
    • What is important for libraries to offer?
      • What people think is important for libraries to offers? (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
      • Women are more likely than men to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
    • Examples
      • Librarians to help people find information they need
      • Borrowing books
      • Free access to computers and the Internet
      • Quiet study spaces for adults and children
      • Programs and classes for children and teens
      • Research resources such as free databases
      • Job, employment, and career resources
      • Free events and activities, such as classes and cultural events, for all ages
      • Free public meeting spaces
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and programs ;libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Coordinate more closely with schools in providing resources to kids
      • Offer free early literacy programs to help young children prepare for school
      • Have completely separate locations or spaces for different services
      • Have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing at the library
      • Offer a broader selection of e-books
      • Offer more interactive learning experiences similar to museum exhibits
      • Help users digitize materials such as family photos or historical documents
      • Have most library service online so users can access them without having to visit the library
      • Make most services automated
      • Move some print books and stacks out of the library to free up more space
    • The new services people say they would (and would not) use
      • How likely American say they would be to use various library services (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to say they would use the following services (bar graph)
      • Examples
        • An online research service where you could post questions and get responses from librarians
        • A program that allowed people to try out the newest tech devices or applications
        • Personalized online accounts that give you customized recommendations for books and services based on your past library activity
        • A cell phone app that allows you to access and use library services from your phone and see what programs the library offers
        • Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself
        • A cell phone app that helps you locate material within the library by guiding you with GPS
        • E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read
        • A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like movies or your own e-books
        • Classes on how to download e-books to handheld devices
        • Classes or instruction on how to use handheld reading devices like e-book readers and tablet computers 
  • Part 5:  The present and the future of libraries
    • Libraries' strengths
    • What should be libraries' 'guiding principle'?
    • Things to change
    • Library innovations
    • Roadblocks and concerns


Reading & Library Habits in Different Communities.  (Pew Research Center, 12/20/2012)

  • Urban/Suburban/Rural
    • Book readers
    • Device owners
    • Among e-book readers
    • Purposes for reading
    • Library activities
    • Where people get book recommendations


Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.  (Pew Internet, 10/23/2012)

  •  General reading habits
    • Book readers by age (graph)
    • Book formats read in the past year, by age group (graph)
    • E-books beyond e-readers (graph)
    • How e-content has affected younger Americans' reading habits
  • When to borrow, when to buy
    • Thinking about the last book you read, in any format, did you... (graph)
  • Library use
    • Library use in the past year (table)
    • How important is the public library to you and your family?  (graph)
  • How library patrons' habits have changed since they began borrowing e-books
  • Library patrons' experiences with e-book borrowing
    • How they find out about e-books
    • The checkout process
  • Non e-book borrowers

Libraries, patrons, and e-books.  (Pew Internet, 6/22/2012)


UPDATE. Muskego Public Library: Annual Circulation and Program Attendance, 2009-2017






Ranked in order by percentage change in annual circulation from  2016 to 2017, minus to plus.  

Related posts:
Milwaukee Public Library.  (10/5/2018)
Waukesha Public Library.  (10/5/2018)
Kenosha Public Library.  (10/6/2018)
Neenah Public Library.  (10/6/2018)
La Crosse Public Library.  (10/6/2018)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (10/7/2018)
Middleton Public Library.  (10/8/2018)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (10/8/2018)
Racine Public Library.  (10/9/2018)
Verona Public Library.  (10/10/2018)
La Crosse County Library.  (10/13/2018)
Franklin Public Library.  (10/13/2018)
11/16/2017 update starts here.




Muskego Public Library in the news:
Getting creative: Now's the time to help recreate the Muskego children's library.  (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 5/25/2017)
Muskego Public Library director praised as he leaves to head Wauwatosa Library.  (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 6/29/2017)


9/7/2016 update starts here.



Source:  Wisconsin Public Library Service Data (2015 preliminary)

Recent Muskego PL news:
Muskego Public Library surveying resident about library and services.  (Musekgo-New Berlin Now, 1/6/2016)
The survey suggests numerous enhancements of the physical space and several potential additional services. It asks residents how much they like each idea. The survey also seeks to find out what patrons think of the library as it currently is.


Original 10/14/2015 post starts here.




Statistics found at Wisconsin Public Library Service Data: 1996 - Preliminary 2014. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction)

How libraries rank



Related reading:
Libraries at the Crossroads.  (Pew Research Center, 9/15/2015)
  • Summary
    • Public wants libraries to advance education, improve digital literacy and serve key groups (bar graph()
    • The big questions:  What should happen to the books?  What should happen to the buildings?
      • Growing public support for moving some books and stacks to create space for community and tech services (line graph)
    • Large percentages of Americans see libraries as part of the educational ecosystem and as resources for promoting digital and information literacy.
    • Many believe libraries should be pathways to economic opportunity, especially when it comes to providing resources for business development, jobs search and enhancing workforce skills.
    • Many think closing their local public library would effect their communities, and a third say it would have a major impact on them and their families.
    • Civic activists are more likely to use libraries (bar graph)
    • A majority of Americans say libraries should provide services to help recent immigrants, veterans and active-duty military personnel.
    • Many view public libraries as important resources for finding health information and some conduct such services using libraries' online access resources.
    • Low-income Americans, Hispanics and African-Americans are more likely to say that libraries impact their lives and communities than other Americans.
  • Chapter 1:  Who uses libraries and what they do at their libraries?
    • People think closing their libraries would hurt their communities (bar graph)
    • Library users are evident throughout the population
      • Women and those with higher levels of education are more likely to have used a library last year (table)
    • Who uses library websites
      • Women, parents, and those with higher levels of education are more likely to use library websites or mobile apps (table)
    • Awareness of e-book lending by libraries is growing:  6% have borrowed an e-book
    • What people do at libraries
      • Print book borrowing and use of librarians for reference have dropped a bit (line graph)
    • Computers and internet access at libraries are particularly used by African Americans, Hispanics and those in lower-income households 
    • How people use library websites
      • People use library websites for a variety of purposes (table)
    • How libraries contribute to communities
      • People think libraries can be helpful in learning and information sharing activities (bar graph)
  • Chapter 2:  Libraries and services for learning, key groups and economic opportunities
    • Public wants libraries to advance education, improve digital literacy and service key groups (bar graph)
      • 'should definitely do'
      • 'should maybe do'
      • 'should definitely not do'
    • Libraries and education
    • Libraries as provider of resources for immigrants and veterans -- and those who want technology help
    • Libraries, economic opportunity and workforce skills
    • Libraries as centers of civic collaboration
      • Community activists are more likely to use libraries (bar graph)

Public Libraries and Hispanics.  (Pew Research Center, 3/17/2015)
  • From "Note on Terminology".  The terms “Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.  
  • Foreign-born Hispanics use libraries less than U.S.-born Hispanics, whites and blacks.  (bar graph)
  • Immigrant Hispanic library users rate library services highest
    • (table)
    • Hispanic immigrants see major impact of library closing on their families and their communities more than others (bar graph)
  • Public Opinion About Libraries (white, black, Hispanic)
    • Overall positive feelings about libraries (bar graph)
  • Accessing public libraries
  • Who are the Hispanic library users?
  • How Latinos consume information
  • Ease of finding information
  • Full report


Younger Americans and Public Libraries.  (Pew Research Center, 9/10/2014)
  • Summary of findings
    • There are actually three different “generations” of younger Americans with distinct book reading habits, library usage patterns, and attitudes about libraries.
    • Millennials’ lives are full of technology, but they are more likely than their elders to say that important information is not available on the internet.
    • Millennials are quite similar to their elders when it comes to the amount of book reading they do, but young adults are more likely to have read a book in the past 12 months.
    • The community and general media-use activities of younger adults are different from older adults.
    • As a group, Millennials are as likely as older adults to have used a library in the past 12 months, and more likely to have used a library website.
    • As with the general population, most younger Americans know where their local library is, but many say they are unfamiliar with all the services it may offer.
  • A Demographic Portrait of Younger America
    • Student status (table)
    • Employment (table)
    • Students' education level (table)
  • Younger Americans' Reading Habits and Technology Use
    • How often do you read a book, including print, audiobooks, and e-books?  (table)
    • Reading habits among young Americans (table)
    • Most readers say they purchase most of the books they read (table)
    • Other activities and media consumption
      • Community activities (table)
      • Entertainment and media activities (table)
    • Technology habits and views
      • Technology use and gadget ownership (with table)
    • Views about the Internet (with table)
  • Younger Americans' Relationships with Public Libraries
    • Public library use
      • Recent public library use (table)
      • Total public library use (table)
      • Visited a public library in person in the past year, over time (table)
      • Used a public library website in the past year, over time (table)
      • Frequency of library visits among Americans 16+ who visited a library in the past year (table)
      • Frequency of library website usage (table)
      • Frequency of library visits among Americans who have ever visited a library (table)
    • Experiences with libraries
      • How long have you lived in the neighborhood where you live now? (table)
      • Do you know where the closest public library is to where you live?  (table)
      • Younger Americans are less likely to know about "all or most" of the services and programs at their local public libraries (table)
      • Most describe public library's physical condition positively (table)
    • Views on the evolving role of public libraries in their communities
      • Younger age groups less likely to say their local public library's closing would have a major impact on their family or community (bar graph)
    • Importance of library services
      • How important are these public services to you and your family?  (bar graph)
      • How important are these public services to you and your family? (table)
    • Broader views about libraries
      • Younger Americans' views on public libraries' roles in their communities (bar graph)
      • Views on public libraries' roles in their communities (bar graph)
      • Views on public libraries and technology (bar graph)
      • "Public libraries are important because they promote literacy and love of reading." (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Because it provides free access to materials and resources, the public library plays an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed."  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Having a public library improves the quality of life in a community."  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Public libraries provide many services people would have a hard time finding elsewhere."  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "People do not need public libraries as much as they used to because they can find most information on their own,"  (% who strongly agree; table)
      • "Public libraries have not done a good job in keeping up with new technologies."  (% who strongly agree; table)

From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers -- and Beyond.  (Pew Research Center, 3/13/2014)
  • Summary of Findings
    • Broad themes and major findings
      • Public library users and proponents are not a niche group
      • Americans' library habits do not exist in a vacuum
      • Life stage and special circumstances are linked to library use and higher engagement with information
    • The spectrum of public library engagement in America
      • High engagement
        • Library Lovers (10%)
        • Information Omnivores (20%)
      • Medium engagement
        • Solid Center (30%)
        • Print Traditionalists (9%)
      • Low engagement
        • Not for Me (4%)
        • Young and Restless (7%)
        • Rooted and Roadblocked (7%)
      • Non-engagement
        • Distant Admirers (10%) 
        • Off the Grid (4%)
      • Typology snapshot:  Groups by level of engagement with public libraries (pie graph)
      • Public library engagement:  Group overviews (table)
    • Group portraits (each of 9 includes the following information)
      • Overview
      • Who they are
      • Lifestyle
      • Relationship with libraries
    • General patterns in Americans' engagement with libraries
      • Socioeconomic status
      • Parenthood
      • Ties to learning acquisition
    • Broader trends in Americans' information  habits
      • Acquiring information is often a social process in which trusted helpers matter
      • Technology use is not so much a substitute for "offline" activities as it is an enhancement tool
      • Libraries score high ease of access and use -- even among those who are not frequent users
      • There are people who have never visited a library who still have positive views of public libraries and their roles in their communities
  • High Engagement
    • High engagement groups (pie graph)
    • Library lovers visit libraries more than information omnivores (column graph)
    • Library Lovers
      • Overview
        • Library Lovers' recent public library usage (column graph)
      • Who they are
        • Gender
        • Age
        • Income and jobs
        • Education
        • Marriage and parenting
        • A demographic portrait (series of column graphs)
        • Other lifestyle notes
        • Library lovers:  Where they live (column graphs)
          • Region
          • Community type
        • Library lovers' community activities (column graph)
      • Technology and information habits
        • Library Lovers' technology profile (table)
        • Defining information traits
        • Library Lovers' information habit (column graph)
        • Library Lovers' views about.... (tables)
          • Learning new information
          • Ease of finding information
          • East of completing tasks
      • Relationship to public libraries
        • Public library use and experience
          • Library Lovers' public library usage (column graph)
          • How well-informed do you feel about the services your public library offers (column graph)
        • Public library attitudes
          • Views about public libraries in the community (table)
          • Views about public libraries and technology (table)
          • Most Library Lovers say local library's closing would have a major impact (column graph)
          • The importance of individual library services (table)
    • Information Omnivores (same general format as above)
  • Medium Engagement (same general format)
  • Low Engagement (same general format)
    • Low engagement groups vary in the view of public library (column graph)
    • Few Young and Restless know where the closest public library is to where they live (column graph()
    • Low engagement group differ in their in the perceptions of the impact of local public library's closing (column graph)
    • Few Not for Me say local library's close would have major impact on community (column graph)
    • Most Rooted and Roadblocked members have lived in their current neighborhood for at least 11 years.  (column graph)
  • Non-engagement.  (same general format)
    • Over half of those Off the Grid did not read any books in the past year (column graph)

How Americans Value Public Libraries in Their Communities.  (Pew Internet, 12/11/2013)
  • The important of public libraries to their communities 
    • If your local library closed, what impact would that have on you and your family?  On your community?  ( bar graph)
  • Though many libraries are seen as important, there are varying levels of enthusiasm for different services
    • How important are these services to you and your family?  (list of 9; bar graph)
  • Most Americans know where their local library is, but many are unfamiliar with all the services they offer
    • How well informed do you feel about the different services your public library offers? (bar graph)
  • 54% of Americans have used a library in the past 12 months and 72% live in a "library household"
  • Most Americans who have ever used a library have had positive experiences


Parents, Children, and Libraries.  (Pew Internet, 5/1/2013)

  • Part 1:  A profile of parents
    • Demographic profile of a sample of parents vs. national parameters (table)
    • Demographic profile of parents and other adults (table)
  • Part 2:  Parents and reading
    • Reading frequency for parents and other adults (table)
    • Types of books read in past 12 months differs for parents and other adults (column graph)
  • Part 3:  Parents and reading to children
    • How often parents read to children, by age of youngest child (table)
    • Characteristics of parents who read to their child every day (table)
    • Parents say reading print books is very important to their children (pie graph)
  • Part 4:  Parents and libraries
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities 
    • How important libraries are to parents
      • How important are libraries (bar graph)
      • Library use among parents and other adults (table)
      • Characteristics of parents by library patronage (table)
    • Recollection of library use by family members and experiences at libraries
      • Overall library experiences are positive for almost all Americans (bar graph)
      • Parents are more likely to have a library (bar graph)
    • Changes in library use in recent years 
      • Changes in library use (bar graph)
      • The main reasons parents' library use has increased in the past 5 years (table)
      • Frequency of library visits, parents and other adults (bar graph)
    • Activities at libraries
      • What parents do at libraries (bar graph)
      • How often people get help from library staff (bar graph)
      • How helpful was library staff (bar graph)
    • How much people know about what their library offers
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
      • How much do parents know about the different services and programs the public library offers?  (bar graph)
  • Part 5:  Parents, children and libraries
    • Parents value libraries for their children
      • Importance of libraries to parents (bar graph)
      • How important are libraries for children (bar graph)
      • Reason for importance of libraries (bar graph)
      • Parents who say each is a MAJOR reason libraries are important (table)
      • Library use by children (table)
      • Frequency of children's visits to library in past 12 months (pie graph)
      • Child's age makes a difference in how library is used (column graph)
    • Parents' experiences (focus group responses)
    • Community
    • Responsibility  (Several parents in our focus groups said that they wanted their children to use the library so that they could learn about personal responsibility, as well as how to act appropriately in public spaces.)
    • Safety
  • Part 6:  Parents and library service
    • What is important for libraries to offer
      • What parents think is important for libraries to offer (bar graph)
      • Parents who say EACH is important for libraries to offer (table)
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and program libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Parents are more likely than other adults to support a few changes to library service (bar graph)
    • The new services peoplel say they would and would not use 
      • How likely say they would be to use various library service (bar graph)
      • Parents are more likely than other adults to say they would use new library offerings (bar graph)
      • Parents of teenagers are more likely than other parents to say they would use some of these library services (column graph)
  • Part 7.  Librarians' thoughts
    • Early childhood literacy and programs for children
    • Coordinating with schools
    • Tutoring and help with schoolwork
    • E-books & tablets
    • Interactive experiences
    • On reaching parents
    • On using space in the library
    • Libraries as general information resource for parents
    • What libraries should change

Library Services in the Digital Age.  (Pew Internet, 1/22/2013)

  • Part 1:  The role of libraries in people's lives and communities
    • Family members' library use from childhood
      • Did anyone else in your family use public libraries when you were growing up?  (table)
    • Americans' library use
      • Have you ever visited a library or bookmobile in person?  (table)
      • Visited a library in-person in the last year?  (table)
      • A snapshot of Americans' library use habits (table)
    • Experiences at public libraries are positive
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities
    • How important are libraries to you and your family?
      • How important are libraries?  (bar graph)
    • Libraries' importance to the community as a whole
      • How important are libraries? (table)
  • Part 2:  What people do at libraries and library websites
    • Activities at libraries
      • (bar graph)
      • Browse the shelves for books or media
      • Borrow print books
      • Research topics that interest them
      • Get help from a librarian
      • Sit, read and study, or watch or listen to media
      • Use a research database
      • Attend or bring a younger person to a class, program, or event designed for children or teens
      • Borrow a DVD or videotape of a movie or TV show
      • Read or check out printed magazines or newspapers
      • Attend a meeting of a group
      • Attend a class, program or lecture for adults
      • Borrow or download an audiobook
      • Borrow a music CD
    • How frequently people receive assistance from library staff
      • (bar graph)
        • by race/ethnicity
        • by household income
    • Use of library websites
      • (table)
    • Changes in library use in recent years
      • The main reasons patrons' library use has changed in recent years (table)
    • Technology users and library use
      • Tech users more likely than non-tech users to say they use the library less than they used to (bar graph)
  • Part 3:  Technology use at libraries
    • Those who have used free internet and computers in their communities (table)
    • Use of computers and the internet at libraries
      • Internet use at libraries (table)
    • How important is free internet use at libraries?
      • (table)
  • Part 4:  What people want from their libraries
    • How much people know about what their libraries offer
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
    • What is important for libraries to offer?
      • What people think is important for libraries to offers? (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
      • Women are more likely than men to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
    • Examples
      • Librarians to help people find information they need
      • Borrowing books
      • Free access to computers and the Internet
      • Quiet study spaces for adults and children
      • Programs and classes for children and teens
      • Research resources such as free databases
      • Job, employment, and career resources
      • Free events and activities, such as classes and cultural events, for all ages
      • Free public meeting spaces
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and programs ;libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Coordinate more closely with schools in providing resources to kids
      • Offer free early literacy programs to help young children prepare for school
      • Have completely separate locations or spaces for different services
      • Have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing at the library
      • Offer a broader selection of e-books
      • Offer more interactive learning experiences similar to museum exhibits
      • Help users digitize materials such as family photos or historical documents
      • Have most library service online so users can access them without having to visit the library
      • Make most services automated
      • Move some print books and stacks out of the library to free up more space
    • The new services people say they would (and would not) use
      • How likely American say they would be to use various library services (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to say they would use the following services (bar graph)
      • Examples
        • An online research service where you could post questions and get responses from librarians
        • A program that allowed people to try out the newest tech devices or applications
        • Personalized online accounts that give you customized recommendations for books and services based on your past library activity
        • A cell phone app that allows you to access and use library services from your phone and see what programs the library offers
        • Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself
        • A cell phone app that helps you locate material within the library by guiding you with GPS
        • E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read
        • A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like movies or your own e-books
        • Classes on how to download e-books to handheld devices
        • Classes or instruction on how to use handheld reading devices like e-book readers and tablet computers 
  • Part 5:  The present and the future of libraries
    • Libraries' strengths
    • What should be libraries' 'guiding principle'?
    • Things to change
    • Library innovations
    • Roadblocks and concerns


Reading & Library Habits in Different Communities.  (Pew Research Center, 12/20/2012)

  • Urban/Suburban/Rural
    • Book readers
    • Device owners
    • Among e-book readers
    • Purposes for reading
    • Library activities
    • Where people get book recommendations


Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.  (Pew Internet, 10/23/2012)

  •  General reading habits
    • Book readers by age (graph)
    • Book formats read in the past year, by age group (graph)
    • E-books beyond e-readers (graph)
    • How e-content has affected younger Americans' reading habits
  • When to borrow, when to buy
    • Thinking about the last book you read, in any format, did you... (graph)
  • Library use
    • Library use in the past year (table)
    • How important is the public library to you and your family?  (graph)
  • How library patrons' habits have changed since they began borrowing e-books
  • Library patrons' experiences with e-book borrowing
    • How they find out about e-books
    • The checkout process
  • Non e-book borrowers

Libraries, patrons, and e-books.  (Pew Internet, 6/22/2012)