Saturday, April 13, 2019

Office and retail space for lease along University Avenue between Allen Boulevard and Park Street in Middleton WI


6230 University Avenue.  
Last occupied, six years ago, by Mi Cocina, this building started out as a hamburger joint in the 1960s.
Photos by Retiring Guy

6225 University Avenue
Rambling, 2-story, 1960s-era building with a number of health-related tenants.

6300 University Avenue
Former location of Associated Bank

6333 University Avenue
Mid Town Square shopping center 

Suites 113 and 114 are available

6401 University Avenue
Former Chicken Run (opened December 2017, closed November 2018) and former Crandall's Carryout and Catering

6415 University Avenue
Built on the site of the iconic Rusty's Bar, Sonic got off to a blistering starts, with Middleton police having to direct traffic on University Avenue as well as a few side states.  It quickly became a place that most people avoided.

6519 University Avenue
This Jiffy Lube location is in its second year of being "closed for remodel".

6602 University Avenue
Office building contains 6 to 8 suites.  When my wife and I first moved to Middleton, my ophthalmologist worked out of one.  Despite the business names on the signs, the building seems to be deserted, as there are rarely any cars parked here.

6615 University Avenue
Say goodbye to Papa John's.  (I say good riddance.)


6771 University Avenue
On the Avenue is a late 1980s/early 1990s redevelopment project that replaced a series of single-occupancy, rundown buildings, including one that, from its architectural design, looked to be one of Middleton's first convenience stores (sans gas pumps).

3 of the 14 spaces are available for lease.  100% occupancy has never been a thing here.




Too many Democrats snoozed their way through Wisconsin's Supreme Court race (Milwaukee County edition)

An election that is nonpartisan in name only.

Sources:  Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (2018, 2019)

Hagedorn received 11% more votes than Screnock, while Neubauer received 26% more votes than Dallet. 


Related reading:
Hagedorn's Ugly Wake-up Call.  (Shepherd Express, 4/9/2019)
Just in time to prevent progressive Wisconsin voters from getting too cocky about ridding their state of rightwing Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Brian Hagedorn, an extremely disturbing state Supreme Court candidate, appears to have eked out a narrow victory. 
It was an ugly wake-up call after last April’s election of respected Justice Rebecca Dallet to the court and November’s Democratic sweep by Gov. Tony Evers, Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Attorney General Josh Kaul. 
Democrats had high hopes of continuing to restore Wisconsin’s reputation as a reliably progressive state ahead of the 2020 presidential election when Appeals Court Judge Lisa Neubauer’s opponent turned out to be Walker’s former legal counsel Hagedorn, who expressed contempt for same-sex relationships and considered gays the equivalent of people engaging in sex with animals
GOP sees positive 2020 sign in Wisconsin Supreme Court race (Washington Post, 4/3/2019)
While Republicans were excited, they were also cautious about what Hagedorn’s showing means for President Donald Trump’s re-election. “Nobody should assume because Republicans won this race that they will continue to win everything else,” Republican strategist and former state GOP leader Brandon Scholz said. 
“This is one election where all the pieces came together at the end. 2020 is an entirely different, politically charged animal with the presidential race.”
Gains in northern Wisconsin boost Hagedorn to narrow lead in Wisconsin Supreme Court race.  (Milwaukee Journal  Sentinel, 4/3/2019) 

Exhibit E, Langlade County, shown above.  Of the 20 counties with the biggest swings in a conservative direction over the 2018 court race, all but two were in those two northern TV markets. 
A Red Warning Sign:  A Wisconsin election brings double disappointment for Democrats.  (The New York Times, 4/5/2019).
Wisconsin Supreme Court races are statewide, and Hagedorn’s win suggests that Wisconsin remains up for grabs heading into President Trump’s re-election campaign. Republican voters now seem quite energized, and turnout was high in conservative areas, like Waukesha County, just west of Milwaukee. “The GOP’s win in Wisconsin Supreme Court race showed a base that’s waking up,” Reid Wilson of The Hill noted.  [emphasis added]

How other counties voted:
Adams.  (4/9/2019)
Ashland.  (4/9/2019)
Barron.  (4/9/2019)
Bayfield.  (4/9/2019)
Brown.  (4/9/2019)
Buffalo.  (4/9/2019)
Burnett.  (4/9/2019)
Calumet.  (4/9/2019
Chippewa.  (4/9/2019)
Clark.  (4/9/2019)
Columbia.  (4/9/2019)
Crawford.  (4/9/2019)
Dane.  (4/9/2019)
Dodge.  (4/10/2019)
Door.  (4/10/2019)
Douglas.  (4/10/2019)
Dunn.  (4/10/2019)
Eau Claire.  (4/10/2019)
Florence.  (4/10/2019)
Fond du Lac.  (4/10/2019)
Forest.  (4/10/2019)
Grant.  (4/10/2019)
Green.  (4/10/2019)
Green Lake. (4/10/2019)
Iowa  (4/11/2019)
Iron. (4/11/2019)
Jackson.  (4/11/2019)
Jefferson.  (4/11/2019)
Juneau.  (4/11/2019)
Kenosha.  (4/11/2019)
Kewaunee. (4/12/2019)
La Crosse.  (4/12/2019)
Lafayette. (4/12/2019)
Langlade.  (4/12/2019)
Lincoln.  (4/12/2019)
Manitowoc.  (4/12/2019)
Marathon.  (4/13/2019)
Marinette.  (4/13/2019)
Marquette.  (4/13/2019)
Menomonie.  (4/13/2019)

Too many Democrats snoozed their way through Wisconsin's Supreme Court race (Menominee County edition)

An election that is nonpartisan in name only.

Sources:  Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (2018, 2019)

An anamoly due to the small number of votes.  Hagedorn received 105% more votes than Screnock, while Neubauer received 128% more votes than Dallet. 


Source: Wikipedia

Related reading:
Hagedorn's Ugly Wake-up Call.  (Shepherd Express, 4/9/2019)
Just in time to prevent progressive Wisconsin voters from getting too cocky about ridding their state of rightwing Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Brian Hagedorn, an extremely disturbing state Supreme Court candidate, appears to have eked out a narrow victory. 
It was an ugly wake-up call after last April’s election of respected Justice Rebecca Dallet to the court and November’s Democratic sweep by Gov. Tony Evers, Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Attorney General Josh Kaul. 
Democrats had high hopes of continuing to restore Wisconsin’s reputation as a reliably progressive state ahead of the 2020 presidential election when Appeals Court Judge Lisa Neubauer’s opponent turned out to be Walker’s former legal counsel Hagedorn, who expressed contempt for same-sex relationships and considered gays the equivalent of people engaging in sex with animals
GOP sees positive 2020 sign in Wisconsin Supreme Court race (Washington Post, 4/3/2019)
While Republicans were excited, they were also cautious about what Hagedorn’s showing means for President Donald Trump’s re-election. “Nobody should assume because Republicans won this race that they will continue to win everything else,” Republican strategist and former state GOP leader Brandon Scholz said. 
“This is one election where all the pieces came together at the end. 2020 is an entirely different, politically charged animal with the presidential race.”
Gains in northern Wisconsin boost Hagedorn to narrow lead in Wisconsin Supreme Court race.  (Milwaukee Journal  Sentinel, 4/3/2019) 

Exhibit E, Langlade County, shown above.  Of the 20 counties with the biggest swings in a conservative direction over the 2018 court race, all but two were in those two northern TV markets. 
A Red Warning Sign:  A Wisconsin election brings double disappointment for Democrats.  (The New York Times, 4/5/2019).
Wisconsin Supreme Court races are statewide, and Hagedorn’s win suggests that Wisconsin remains up for grabs heading into President Trump’s re-election campaign. Republican voters now seem quite energized, and turnout was high in conservative areas, like Waukesha County, just west of Milwaukee. “The GOP’s win in Wisconsin Supreme Court race showed a base that’s waking up,” Reid Wilson of The Hill noted.  [emphasis added]

How other counties voted:
Adams.  (4/9/2019)
Ashland.  (4/9/2019)
Barron.  (4/9/2019)
Bayfield.  (4/9/2019)
Brown.  (4/9/2019)
Buffalo.  (4/9/2019)
Burnett.  (4/9/2019)
Calumet.  (4/9/2019
Chippewa.  (4/9/2019)
Clark.  (4/9/2019)
Columbia.  (4/9/2019)
Crawford.  (4/9/2019)
Dane.  (4/9/2019)
Dodge.  (4/10/2019)
Door.  (4/10/2019)
Douglas.  (4/10/2019)
Dunn.  (4/10/2019)
Eau Claire.  (4/10/2019)
Florence.  (4/10/2019)
Fond du Lac.  (4/10/2019)
Forest.  (4/10/2019)
Grant.  (4/10/2019)
Green.  (4/10/2019)
Green Lake. (4/10/2019)
Iowa  (4/11/2019)
Iron. (4/11/2019)
Jackson.  (4/11/2019)
Jefferson.  (4/11/2019)
Juneau.  (4/11/2019)
Kenosha.  (4/11/2019)
Kewaunee. (4/12/2019)
La Crosse.  (4/12/2019)
Lafayette. (4/12/2019)
Langlade.  (4/12/2019)
Lincoln.  (4/12/2019)
Manitowoc.  (4/12/2019)
Marathon.  (4/13/2019)
Marinette.  (4/13/2019)
Marquette.  (4/13/2019)

Too many Democrats snoozed their way through Wisconsin's Supreme Court race (Marquette County edition)

An election that is nonpartisan in name only.

Sources:  Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (2018, 2019)

Hagedorn received 51% more votes than Screnock, while Neubauer received 1% more votes than Dallet. 

Source: Wikipedia

Related reading:
Hagedorn's Ugly Wake-up Call.  (Shepherd Express, 4/9/2019)
Just in time to prevent progressive Wisconsin voters from getting too cocky about ridding their state of rightwing Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Brian Hagedorn, an extremely disturbing state Supreme Court candidate, appears to have eked out a narrow victory. 
It was an ugly wake-up call after last April’s election of respected Justice Rebecca Dallet to the court and November’s Democratic sweep by Gov. Tony Evers, Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Attorney General Josh Kaul. 
Democrats had high hopes of continuing to restore Wisconsin’s reputation as a reliably progressive state ahead of the 2020 presidential election when Appeals Court Judge Lisa Neubauer’s opponent turned out to be Walker’s former legal counsel Hagedorn, who expressed contempt for same-sex relationships and considered gays the equivalent of people engaging in sex with animals
GOP sees positive 2020 sign in Wisconsin Supreme Court race (Washington Post, 4/3/2019)
While Republicans were excited, they were also cautious about what Hagedorn’s showing means for President Donald Trump’s re-election. “Nobody should assume because Republicans won this race that they will continue to win everything else,” Republican strategist and former state GOP leader Brandon Scholz said. 
“This is one election where all the pieces came together at the end. 2020 is an entirely different, politically charged animal with the presidential race.”
Gains in northern Wisconsin boost Hagedorn to narrow lead in Wisconsin Supreme Court race.  (Milwaukee Journal  Sentinel, 4/3/2019) 

Exhibit E, Langlade County, shown above.  Of the 20 counties with the biggest swings in a conservative direction over the 2018 court race, all but two were in those two northern TV markets. 
A Red Warning Sign:  A Wisconsin election brings double disappointment for Democrats.  (The New York Times, 4/5/2019).
Wisconsin Supreme Court races are statewide, and Hagedorn’s win suggests that Wisconsin remains up for grabs heading into President Trump’s re-election campaign. Republican voters now seem quite energized, and turnout was high in conservative areas, like Waukesha County, just west of Milwaukee. “The GOP’s win in Wisconsin Supreme Court race showed a base that’s waking up,” Reid Wilson of The Hill noted.  [emphasis added]

How other counties voted:
Adams.  (4/9/2019)
Ashland.  (4/9/2019)
Barron.  (4/9/2019)
Bayfield.  (4/9/2019)
Brown.  (4/9/2019)
Buffalo.  (4/9/2019)
Burnett.  (4/9/2019)
Calumet.  (4/9/2019
Chippewa.  (4/9/2019)
Clark.  (4/9/2019)
Columbia.  (4/9/2019)
Crawford.  (4/9/2019)
Dane.  (4/9/2019)
Dodge.  (4/10/2019)
Door.  (4/10/2019)
Douglas.  (4/10/2019)
Dunn.  (4/10/2019)
Eau Claire.  (4/10/2019)
Florence.  (4/10/2019)
Fond du Lac.  (4/10/2019)
Forest.  (4/10/2019)
Grant.  (4/10/2019)
Green.  (4/10/2019)
Green Lake. (4/10/2019)
Iowa  (4/11/2019)
Iron. (4/11/2019)
Jackson.  (4/11/2019)
Jefferson.  (4/11/2019)
Juneau.  (4/11/2019)
Kenosha.  (4/11/2019)
Kewaunee. (4/12/2019)
La Crosse.  (4/12/2019)
Lafayette. (4/12/2019)
Langlade.  (4/12/2019)
Lincoln.  (4/12/2019)
Manitowoc.  (4/12/2019)
Marathon.  (4/13/2019)
Marinette.  (4/13/2019)

Too many Democrats snoozed their way through Wisconsin's Supreme Court race (Marinette County edition)

An election that is nonpartisan in name only.

Sources:  Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (2018, 2019)

Hagedorn received 51% more votes than Screnock, while Neubauer received 1% more votes than Dallet. 

Sorted by % change # of votes for Hagedorn (high to low)

Related reading:
Hagedorn's Ugly Wake-up Call.  (Shepherd Express, 4/9/2019)
Just in time to prevent progressive Wisconsin voters from getting too cocky about ridding their state of rightwing Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Brian Hagedorn, an extremely disturbing state Supreme Court candidate, appears to have eked out a narrow victory. 
It was an ugly wake-up call after last April’s election of respected Justice Rebecca Dallet to the court and November’s Democratic sweep by Gov. Tony Evers, Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Attorney General Josh Kaul. 
Democrats had high hopes of continuing to restore Wisconsin’s reputation as a reliably progressive state ahead of the 2020 presidential election when Appeals Court Judge Lisa Neubauer’s opponent turned out to be Walker’s former legal counsel Hagedorn, who expressed contempt for same-sex relationships and considered gays the equivalent of people engaging in sex with animals
GOP sees positive 2020 sign in Wisconsin Supreme Court race (Washington Post, 4/3/2019)
While Republicans were excited, they were also cautious about what Hagedorn’s showing means for President Donald Trump’s re-election. “Nobody should assume because Republicans won this race that they will continue to win everything else,” Republican strategist and former state GOP leader Brandon Scholz said. 
“This is one election where all the pieces came together at the end. 2020 is an entirely different, politically charged animal with the presidential race.”
Gains in northern Wisconsin boost Hagedorn to narrow lead in Wisconsin Supreme Court race.  (Milwaukee Journal  Sentinel, 4/3/2019) 

Exhibit E, Langlade County, shown above.  Of the 20 counties with the biggest swings in a conservative direction over the 2018 court race, all but two were in those two northern TV markets. 
A Red Warning Sign:  A Wisconsin election brings double disappointment for Democrats.  (The New York Times, 4/5/2019).
Wisconsin Supreme Court races are statewide, and Hagedorn’s win suggests that Wisconsin remains up for grabs heading into President Trump’s re-election campaign. Republican voters now seem quite energized, and turnout was high in conservative areas, like Waukesha County, just west of Milwaukee. “The GOP’s win in Wisconsin Supreme Court race showed a base that’s waking up,” Reid Wilson of The Hill noted.  [emphasis added]

How other counties voted:
Adams.  (4/9/2019)
Ashland.  (4/9/2019)
Barron.  (4/9/2019)
Bayfield.  (4/9/2019)
Brown.  (4/9/2019)
Buffalo.  (4/9/2019)
Burnett.  (4/9/2019)
Calumet.  (4/9/2019
Chippewa.  (4/9/2019)
Clark.  (4/9/2019)
Columbia.  (4/9/2019)
Crawford.  (4/9/2019)
Dane.  (4/9/2019)
Dodge.  (4/10/2019)
Door.  (4/10/2019)
Douglas.  (4/10/2019)
Dunn.  (4/10/2019)
Eau Claire.  (4/10/2019)
Florence.  (4/10/2019)
Fond du Lac.  (4/10/2019)
Forest.  (4/10/2019)
Grant.  (4/10/2019)
Green.  (4/10/2019)
Green Lake. (4/10/2019)
Iowa  (4/11/2019)
Iron. (4/11/2019)
Jackson.  (4/11/2019)
Jefferson.  (4/11/2019)
Juneau.  (4/11/2019)
Kenosha.  (4/11/2019)
Kewaunee. (4/12/2019)
La Crosse.  (4/12/2019)
Lafayette. (4/12/2019)
Langlade.  (4/12/2019)
Lincoln.  (4/12/2019)
Manitowoc.  (4/12/2019)
Marathon.  (4/13/2019)

Too many Democrats snoozed their way through Wisconsin's Supreme Court race (Marathon County edition)

An election that is nonpartisan in name only.

Sources:  Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (2018, 2019)

Hagedorn received 52% more votes than Screnock, while Neubauer received 1% more votes than Dallet. 


Sorted by % change # of votes for Hagedorn (high to low)

Related reading:
Hagedorn's Ugly Wake-up Call.  (Shepherd Express, 4/9/2019)
Just in time to prevent progressive Wisconsin voters from getting too cocky about ridding their state of rightwing Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Brian Hagedorn, an extremely disturbing state Supreme Court candidate, appears to have eked out a narrow victory. 
It was an ugly wake-up call after last April’s election of respected Justice Rebecca Dallet to the court and November’s Democratic sweep by Gov. Tony Evers, Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Attorney General Josh Kaul. 
Democrats had high hopes of continuing to restore Wisconsin’s reputation as a reliably progressive state ahead of the 2020 presidential election when Appeals Court Judge Lisa Neubauer’s opponent turned out to be Walker’s former legal counsel Hagedorn, who expressed contempt for same-sex relationships and considered gays the equivalent of people engaging in sex with animals
GOP sees positive 2020 sign in Wisconsin Supreme Court race (Washington Post, 4/3/2019)
While Republicans were excited, they were also cautious about what Hagedorn’s showing means for President Donald Trump’s re-election. “Nobody should assume because Republicans won this race that they will continue to win everything else,” Republican strategist and former state GOP leader Brandon Scholz said. 
“This is one election where all the pieces came together at the end. 2020 is an entirely different, politically charged animal with the presidential race.”
Gains in northern Wisconsin boost Hagedorn to narrow lead in Wisconsin Supreme Court race.  (Milwaukee Journal  Sentinel, 4/3/2019) 

Exhibit E, Langlade County, shown above.  Of the 20 counties with the biggest swings in a conservative direction over the 2018 court race, all but two were in those two northern TV markets. 
A Red Warning Sign:  A Wisconsin election brings double disappointment for Democrats.  (The New York Times, 4/5/2019).
Wisconsin Supreme Court races are statewide, and Hagedorn’s win suggests that Wisconsin remains up for grabs heading into President Trump’s re-election campaign. Republican voters now seem quite energized, and turnout was high in conservative areas, like Waukesha County, just west of Milwaukee. “The GOP’s win in Wisconsin Supreme Court race showed a base that’s waking up,” Reid Wilson of The Hill noted.  [emphasis added]

How other counties voted:
Adams.  (4/9/2019)
Ashland.  (4/9/2019)
Barron.  (4/9/2019)
Bayfield.  (4/9/2019)
Brown.  (4/9/2019)
Buffalo.  (4/9/2019)
Burnett.  (4/9/2019)
Calumet.  (4/9/2019
Chippewa.  (4/9/2019)
Clark.  (4/9/2019)
Columbia.  (4/9/2019)
Crawford.  (4/9/2019)
Dane.  (4/9/2019)
Dodge.  (4/10/2019)
Door.  (4/10/2019)
Douglas.  (4/10/2019)
Dunn.  (4/10/2019)
Eau Claire.  (4/10/2019)
Florence.  (4/10/2019)
Fond du Lac.  (4/10/2019)
Forest.  (4/10/2019)
Grant.  (4/10/2019)
Green.  (4/10/2019)
Green Lake. (4/10/2019)
Iowa  (4/11/2019)
Iron. (4/11/2019)
Jackson.  (4/11/2019)
Jefferson.  (4/11/2019)
Juneau.  (4/11/2019)
Kenosha.  (4/11/2019)
Kewaunee. (4/12/2019)
La Crosse.  (4/12/2019)
Lafayette. (4/12/2019)
Langlade.  (4/12/2019)
Lincoln.  (4/12/2019)
Manitowoc.  (4/12/2019)

Disappearing cities of Metro Detroit: Garden City, Michigan

It all started here.

Mr. Plumb, 36 years old, of Garden City, Mich., was a transportation specialist at the financially troubled cornpany, which expects to lose more than $1 billion this year. His dismissal was part of several thousand layoffs of white‐collar workers that, according to Chrysler's president, Lee A. Iacocca, will reduce the company's white‐collar work force by 8,700 employees by the end of the year. The corporation has put
Source:  Wikipedia

Garden City's population peaked at 41,864 in 1970. Its 2017 estimated population is 26,650 -- a drop of 15,214 (36%).



Incorporated as a village 1927 and a city in 1933, Garden City is located just north of Inkster, 17 miles west of downtown Detroit.   

Disappearing cities of Metro Detroit.
Allen Park.  (4/11/2019)
Detroit.  (1/1/2019)
Ecorse.  (4/8/2019)
Hamtramck.  (4/5/2019)
Highland Park.  (4/6/2019)
Inkster.  (4/12/2019)
Lincoln Park.  (4/10/2019)
River Rouge.  (4/7/2019)
Wyandotte.  (4/9/2019)



Disappearing cities of the Mountain State


Other disappearing West Virginia cities:
Bluefield.  (3/20/2019)
Charleston.  (3/14/2019)
Clarksburg.  (3/19/2019)
Fairmont.  (3/18/2019)
Huntington.  (3/15/2019)
Logan.  (3/22/2019)
Parkersburg. (3/16/2019)
South Charleston.  (3/21/2019)
Weirton.  (3/17/2019)
Wheeling  (1/16/2019)

                    Disappearing cities of the Buckeye State





Other disappearing cities of the Buckeye State:
Akron. (2/28/2019)
Brook Park (3/3/2019)
Cambridge.  (2/27/2019)
Canton.  (3/1/2019)
Cleveland.  (1/2/2019)
Cleveland Heights.  (3/5/2019)
East Cleveland. (3/2/2019)
East Liverpool.  (2/18/2019)
Euclid.  (3/4/2019)
Gallipolis.  (2/23/2019)
Garfield Heights (3/6/2019)
Ironton.  (2/24/2019)
Lakewood.  (3/8/2019)
Maple Heights, 3/7/2019)
Martins Ferry.  (2/21/2019)
Parma.  (3/9/2019)
Pomeroy.  (2/22/2019)
Portsmouth.  (2/25/2019)
Steubenville.  (2/20/2019)
Warren.  (1/18/2019)
Youngstown.  (1/9/2019)
Zanesville.  (2/26/2019)

Disappearing cities and boroughs of the Keystone State



Aliquippa.  (1/12/2019)
Ambridge.  (1/17/2019)
Arnold.  (1/18/2019)
Braddock.  (1/19/2019)
Bradford, (1/20/2019)
Carbondale.  (1/21/2019)
Charleroi.  (1/22/2019)
Chester.  (1/23/2019)
Clairton.  (1/24/2019)
Coraopolis.  (1/25/2019)
Dickson City.  (1/26/2019)
Donora.  (1/27/2019)
Duquesne.  (1/28/2019)
Farrell.  (1/29/2019)
Harrisburg.  (2/12/2019)
Homestead.  (1/30/2019)
Johnstown.  (1/6/2019)
McKees Rocks.  (1/31/2019)
McKeesport.  (2/1/2019)
Monessen.  (2/2/2019)
Nanticoke.  (2/3/2019)
New Castle.  (2/4/2019)
New Kensington.  (2/5/2019)
Oil City.  (2/6/2019)
Pittsburgh.  (1/13/2019)
Pittston. (2/7/2019)
Scranton.  (1/14/2019)
Shamokin.  (2/8/2019)
Sharon.  (2/9/2019)
Steelton.  (2/11/2019)
Swissvale.  (2/13/2019)
Titusville.  (2/10/2019)
Uniontown.  (2/14/2019)
Washington.  (2/15/2019)
Willkes-Barre.  (2/16/2019)
Wiklinsburg.  (2/17/2018)

Other U.S. disappearing cities


Baltimore, Maryland.  (12/31/2018)
Benton Harbor, Michigan.  (1/15/2019)
Buffalo, New York, (1/8/2019)
Cairo, Illinois.   (1/5/2019)
Detroit, Michigan.  (1/1/2019)
East St. Louis, Illinois.  (1/11/2019)
Flint, Michigan.  (1/7/2019)
Gary, Indiana.  (1/4/2019)
St. Louis, Missouri.  (1/2/2019)