Thursday, April 1, 2021

Moving in the wrong direction: 7-day average of new COVID-19 cases in New Jersey up 52% since February 22



Sussex County, in the Trumpiest part of the state, leads the way.  Trump won the county by nearly 20 percentage points in 2020.


nj.com, 3/24/2021


As of March 7, the Covid Tracking Project is no longer collecting new data.

3/14/2021 update starts here

New York Times

2/15/2021 update starts here

Total tests (positive and negative):  9,997,131
  • Feb 9-15:           337,133 
  • Feb 2-8:             146,041
  • Jan 26-Feb 1:    507,878 
  • Jan 19-25:         370,068   
  • Jan 12-18:         431,293
  • Jan 5-11:           392,004   
  • Dec 29-Jan 4:   146,656
  • Dec 22-28:       361,995 
  • Dec 15-21:       508,888
  • Dec 8-14:         505,352
  • Dec 1-7:           194,297
  • Nov 24-30:       411,230
  • Nov 17-23:       336,196
  • Nov 10-16:       301,783
  • Nov 3-9:           315,490
  • Oct 27-Nov 2:  266,563
  • Oct 20-26:        237,529
  • Oct 13-19:        246,108 
  • Oct 6-12:          213,539
  • Sep 29-Oct 5:   191,764
  • Sep 22-28:        213,610
  • Sep 15-21:        162,821 
  • Sep 8-14:          135,442
  • Sep 1-7:            196,610
  • Aug 25-31:       165,742
  • Aug 18-24:       187,024
  • Aug 11-17:       159,466
  • Aug 4-10:         211,581

New cases per week

  • Feb 9-15:            22,704  (down 7% from previous week)
  • Feb 2-8:              24,382  (down 29%)
  • Jan 26-Feb 1:     34,395  (down 4%)
  • Jan 19-25:          35,877  (down 11%)
  • Jan 12-18:          40,912  (down 9%)
  • Jan 5-11:           45,014  (up 48%)
  • Dec 29-Jan 4:     30,352  (up 8%) 
  • Dec 22-28:         28,202  (down 4%)
  • Dec 15-21:         29,315  (down 16%)
  • Dec 8-14:           33,869  (down 2%)
  • Dec 1-7:             34,375  (up 20%)
  • Nov 24-30:         27,716  (up 15%)
  • Nov 17-23:         24,069  (down 2%)
  • Nov 10-16:         24,840  (up 59%)
  • Nov 3-9:             15,656  (up 38%)
  • Oct 27-Nov 2:    11,313  (up 34%)
  • Oct 20-26:            8,419  (up 17%)
  • Oct 13-19:            7,168  (up 33%)
  • Oct 6-12:              5,384  (up 17%)
  • Sep 29-Oct 5:       4,606  (up 17%)
  • Sep 22-28:            3,953  (up 24%)
  • Sep 15-21:            3,186  (up 9%)
  • Sep 8-14:              2,910  (up 20%)
  • Sep 1-7:                2,430  (up 8%)
  • Aug 25-31:           2,241  (up 15%)
  • Aug 18-24:           1,952  (down 29%)
  • Aug 11-17:           2,736  (up 13%)
  • Aug 4-10:             2,417  (down 14%)  
  • Jul 28-Aug 3:       2,802  (down 2%)
  • July 21-27:           2,849  (up 102%)
  • July 14-20:           1,411  (down 26%)
  • July 7-13:             1,911  (up 43%)
  • Jun 30-Jul 6:        1,339  (down 28%)
  • June 23-29:          1,857  (down 20% )
  • June 16-22:          2,312  (down 11%)
  • June 9-15:            2,606  (down 27%)
  • June 2-8:              3,579  (down 39%)
  • May 26-Jun 1:     5,826 (down 17%)
  • May 19-25:          7,053 
  • May 12-18:          8,095
  • May 5-11:           11,676
  • Apr 28-May 4:    19,231
  • April 21-27:        20,232
  • April 14-20:        24,222
  • April 7-13:          23,494
  • Mar 31-Apr 6:   24,454
  • March 24-30:      15,792



COVID Tracking Project

More data at State of New Jersey

Deaths reported:
  • As of March 16 -          2
  • As of March 23 -        27
  • As of March 30 -      198  (+   171)
  • As of April     6 -   1,003  (+   805)
  • As of April   13 -   2,443  (+1,440)
  • As of April   20 -   4,377  (+1,934)
  • As of April   27 -   6,044  (+1,667)
  • As of May      4 -   7,910  (+1,866)
  • As of May    11 -   9,310  (+1,400)
  • As of May    18 - 10,435  (+1,125)
  • As of May    25 - 11,133  (+   698)
  • As of June      1 - 11,821  (+   688)
  • As of June      8 - 12,214  (+   393) 
  • As of June    15 - 12,676  (+   462)
  • As of June    22 - 12,895  (+   219; adjustment 6/25)
  • As of June    29 - 14,992  (+2, 097)
  • As of July       6 - 15,229  (+   237)
  • As of July     13 - 15,560  (+   231)
  • As of July     20 - 15,519  (+   ) On August 7, 2020, we back-filled New Jersey's Probable deaths with data provided by the state. This removed apparent spikes in deaths due to the state's irregulat reporting.   Sorry, I'm not redoing the whole list.
  • As of July     27 - 15,666  (+     90)
  • As of Aug       3 - 15,756  (+     20)
  • As of Aug     10 - 15,810  (+     54)
  • As of Aug     17 - 15,866   (+    56)
  • As of Aug     24 - 15,910   (+    44)
  • As of Aug     31 - 15,955   (+    45)
  • As of Sep        7 - 15,998   (+    43)
  • As of Sep      14 - 16,036   (+   38)
  • As of Sep      21 - 16,059   (+   23)
  • As of Sep      28 - 16,107   (+   48)
  • As of Oct        5-  16,138   (+   31)
  • As of Oct      12 - 16,175   (+   37)
  • As of Oct      19 - 16,214  (+    39)
  • As of Oct      26 - 16,292  (+    78)
  • As of Nov       2 - 16,352  (+    60) 
  • As of Nov       9 - 16,440  (+    88)
  • As of Nov     16 - 16,580  (+  140)
  • As of Nov     23 - 16,772  (+  192) 
  • As of Nov     30 - 16,993  (+  221)
  • As of Dec       7 -  17,336 (+   343)
  • As of Dec     14 -  17,775 (+   439)
  • As of Dec     21 -  18,223 (+   448)
  • As of Dec     28 -  18,651 (+   428)
  • As of Jan        4 -  19,244 (+   593)
  • As of Jan      11 -  19,932 (+   688)
  • As of Jan      18 -  20,458 (+   526) 
  • As of Jan      25 -  20,972 (+   514) 
  • As of Feb        1-  21,513 (+   541)
  • As of Feb        8 - 22,011 (+   498)
  • As of Feb      15 - 22,466 (+   455)
   
Related reading:
3 Vans, 6 Coolers, a Plane, a Storm and 2 Labs: A Nasal Swab’s Journey.  (The New York Times, 4/13/2020)
“It’s unequivocally worsening,” Gov. Philip D. Murphy of New Jersey said recently, adding, “We’ve got constraints in the entire food chain.” 
Initially, the strain came from a lack of test kits, but now there are not enough nasal swabs, not enough nurses. There is a pileup at the labs themselves and a limited supply of the chemicals needed to identify the virus. 
Two weeks ago at the Bergen Community College in Paramus, a drive-through testing site in the hardest-hit area of New Jersey, residents had to arrive by 3 a.m. to get a spot. Within days, they were told to show up at 11 p.m. the night before.  
As Deaths Mount, Volunteer EMTs At New Jersey's Coronavirus Epicenter Labor On.  (NPR, 4/15/2020)
Teaneck is the hardest hit town in the hardest hit county in the state and was an early epicenter for the outbreak. The rate of infection for the North Jersey suburb of 40,000 people is slightly higher than in New York City. Working the front lines is the all-volunteer, unpaid Teaneck EMT squad that for weeks has responded to an alarming number of calls. 
"This is really when we're needed the most," says Capt. Jacob Finkelstein, 24. "Our volunteers, they're giving 200, 300 percent, whatever it takes to make sure that we are here."
Coronavirus in New Jersey: A timeline of the outbreak.  (nj.com, 3/24/2020)

12 Fraught Hours With E.M.T's in a City Under Siege.  (The New York Times, 4/1/2020)
A few weeks ago, a 911 call for “respiratory distress” would have sent emergency medical technicians — E.M.T.s — rushing into the building to examine the man and take his vitals. Now with coronavirus infections sweeping through the region, the emergency medical workers of Paterson, a poor, industrial city in the penumbra of pandemic-stricken New York, are working in a new, upside-down reality: Don’t go in a home, don’t touch the patient, and don’t take anyone to the hospital, unless absolutely necessary.
Related posts:
Alabama.  (2/15/2021)
Arizona.  (2/15/2021)
Arkansas.  (2/4/2021)
California.  (2/7/2021)
Connecticut.  (8/21/2020)
Florida.  (2/15/2021)
Georgia.  (2/15/2021)
Idaho.  (2/7/2021)
Illinois.  (2/2/2021)
Indiana.  (2/6/2021)
Iowa.  (2/6/2021)
Kansas.  (2/4/2021)
Kentucky.  (2/4/2021)
Louisiana.  (2/6/2021)
Maryland.  (1/27/2021)
Massachusetts.  (2/16/2021)
Michigan.  (2/2/2021)
Minnesota.  (2/4/2021)
Mississippi.  (2/15/2021)
Montana. (2/5/2021)
Nebraska.  (2/4/2021)
Nevada.  (2/3/2021)
New Jersey,  (2/16/2021)
New York.  (2/16/2021)
North Carolina.  (2/7/2021)
North Dakota.  (2/7/2021)
Ohio.  (2/6/2021)
Pennsylvania.  (2/2/2021)
South Carolina.  (2/5/2021)
South Dakota.  (2/4/2021)
Tennessee.  (2/5/2021)
Texas   (2/6/2021)
Utah.  (2/3/2021)
Virginia.  (1/22/2021)
Washington State.  (6/12/2020)
West Virginia.  (2/3/2021)

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