Tuesday, June 25, 2019

GET ME REWRITE Tone-deaf, self-serving billionaries buy up public lands in the West


Photo credit:  The American Prospect

Who Gets to Own the West?A new group of billionaires is shaking up the landscape.  (The New York Times, 6/22/2019)
In the last decade, private land in the United States has become increasingly concentrated in the hands of a few. Today, just 100 families own about 42 million acres across the country, a 65,000-square-mile expanse, according to the Land Report, a magazine that tracks large purchases. Researchers at the magazine have found that the amount of land owned by those 100 families has jumped 50 percent since 2007.

According to the Land Report, the Wilks brothers own just over 700,000 acres of western land.  The average lawn size, not just the front yard, is one-quarter of an acre.


Dear Wall Street Journal editorial board, You neglected to add 'lawyer' to your list. Best, Retiring Guy



Changing education and career landscapes
  1. A law school education is 3 to 5 times more expensive than 30 years ago.  Average student debt:  $200,000
  2. Fewer high-paying jobs available at large law firms
  3. Fewer full-time legal jobs currently available (developing trend)

Canceling Student-Loan Debt Is a Bad Idea.  (The Wall Street Journal, 4/30/2019)

(iPhone screenshots, arrows added)

But the WSJ editorial board prefers to blame the victims.
From the Student Debt Planner article:  If you’re a law school grad, you may be wondering will you ever be able to pay off your law school debt. Loan repayment options are confusing and poor guidance from advisors and some loan servicers can cost lawyers a lot of money paying back their student loans.

According to Merriam-Webster, the first known use of 'snark', the above editorial providing a clear illustration, occurred in 1999.

Other coinages from the same year include:

  1. cyberbullying
  2. dark energy
  3. Generation Z
  4. judgy

Monday, June 24, 2019

The project without a name at 134 South Fair Oaks in Madison WI



Photos by Retiring Guy



Garver Point apartment construction UPDATE: June site visit


From a distance

Photos by Retiring Guy

Up close



4/9/2019 update starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy





3/2/2019 update, " A brutal winter doesn't appear to be slowing down progress", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy


617 square foot 1-bedroom, 1 bath apartment rents for $1,155 per month

818 square foot 1-bedroom, 1 bath apartment with big deck rents for $1,400+ per month


1/3/2019 update starts here

Photos by Retiring Guy



377-square-foot studio starts at $890/month.

471-square-foot studio starts at $1,055/month

606-square-foot studio starts at $1,145/month


11/15/2018 update starts here.

Along Emmet Street (and Capital City Trail) from South Fair Oaks to Garrison Street.

Photos by Retiring Guy




8/10/2018 update starts here.

Not the best time of day to be taking photos here.

Photos by Retiring Guy






Original 11/8/2017 post, "Just another photo op for Retiring Guy:  161-unit apartment proposed for Madison east side", starts here.

The front and west side of the building


Photos by Retiring Guy

The back and west side of the building



Here's a surprise!

The project, slated for 131 S. Fair Oaks Ave., would build a five-story mixed-use 161-unit apartment complex with around 11,400 square feet of first floor commercial and residential space. The site is currently home to a one-story Kessenich’s Ltd. distribution center, which would be demolished.

Around Town Middleton: Free lunch Friday


Walking from Wolff Kubly Ace hardware store to the Willy Street Co-op, hoping to get my errands done before another rain shower passed through, I spot this sign near the intersection of  University Avenue and Branch Street.



Not seeing the name of a business, I look around for a matching red sign with white letters.



Nothing obvious, so I figure the answer is on the other side of the signboard.



1 + 1 = ?

A quick search on my phone confirms that Middleton Jewelers is the Free Lunch Friday location.



I return home just as it starts to sprinkle.

Around Town Middleton posts
June 2019
CBD, just like everywhere else in Wisconsin.  (6/24/2019)
 
February 2019
According to chapter 8.07 of the city ordinances....  (2/4/2019)

January 2019
More than a snow fort, but not a standing-room igloo.  (1/2/2019)
 
December 2018
This section of sidewalk was replaced in 1980.  (12/18/2018)
The post office's new and improved self-service kiosk.  (12/18/2018)

November 2018
Spell checker.  (11/19/2018)

August 2018
Must be on a tight schedule.  (8/6/2018)

July 2018
What type of seeds?  (7/6/2018)

June 2018
If it's not one thing, it's another.  (6/23/2018)
Bloom Bake Shop to reopen as Bloom Bindery, a bakery/bookstore.  (6/15/2018)

May 2018
The Tiedeman Pond frog chorus.  (5/15/2018)

March 2018
Tiedeman Pond winter fish kill.  (3/30/2018)
Hear that lonesome whistle blow.  (3/22/2018)
Explosion on Elmwood Avenue.  (3/20/2018)
Googling 'Henry Hubbard'.  (3/18/2018) 
A not-so-faded Flo strikes a new pose.  (3/12/2018)

February 2018


Around Town Middleton: CBD, just like everywhere else in Wisconsin


Photo by Retiring Guy

In Wisconsin, users of cannabis and CBD are as close as Main Street.  (Green Bay Press Gazette, 6/23/2019)
Kickapoo Kind owner Tim Murphy said he has seen the popularity of cannabis blossom, including among some unlikely people. Customers come from many miles away to check out Murphy’s products. The shop recently moved to larger space on Main Street in Viroqua to handle the demand. 
“I’ve had people come from Richland Center, Prairie du Chien, Elroy, all over,” Murphy said. “All walks of life. I’ve had 90-year-old grandmas in here, and I’ve had little babies (with epilepsy) in here. Every single walk of life that you can think of has walked through that door.”

Surely, Tim, those little babies with epilepsy were in the arms of a parent (or other caregiver).

From the Sinclair Lewis Society FAQ page:
Main Street (1920) With this novel, Lewis added the words "Main Street" (sense 2b) to Americans' vocabulary to represent the closed culture and arrogant contentedness of small towns.

 The Signet Classics paperback edition Retiring Guy purchased in 1970.  Discarded long ago.


Around Town Middleton posts
February 2019
According to chapter 8.07 of the city ordinances....  (2/4/2019)

January 2019
More than a snow fort, but not a standing-room igloo.  (1/2/2019)
 
December 2018
This section of sidewalk was replaced in 1980.  (12/18/2018)
The post office's new and improved self-service kiosk.  (12/18/2018)

November 2018
Spell checker.  (11/19/2018)

August 2018
Must be on a tight schedule.  (8/6/2018)

July 2018
What type of seeds?  (7/6/2018)

June 2018
If it's not one thing, it's another.  (6/23/2018)
Bloom Bake Shop to reopen as Bloom Bindery, a bakery/bookstore.  (6/15/2018)

May 2018
The Tiedeman Pond frog chorus.  (5/15/2018)

March 2018
Tiedeman Pond winter fish kill.  (3/30/2018)
Hear that lonesome whistle blow.  (3/22/2018)
Explosion on Elmwood Avenue.  (3/20/2018)
Googling 'Henry Hubbard'.  (3/18/2018) 
A not-so-faded Flo strikes a new pose.  (3/12/2018)

February 2018

Keeping tabs on the lightning rod for controversy known as Drag Queen Story Hour


From the 6/22/2019 Register-Star report
Outside the library, well over 100 protesters lined East State Street reciting prayers and carrying signs condemning the event, which was held as the city celebrates LGBTQ Pride Month for the first time. “It teaches children to ignore what’s natural,” Rockford resident Stephanie Loehr said. “It is not natural for a man to say he’s a woman and for a woman to say she’s a man. That ignores basic biology and, if you really want to educate children, they should be educated on truth and not on some lies based on how somebody feels.”



From the KOB report:  Outside, a handful of protesters were holding signs. They believed that Drag Queen Storytime sends the wrong message to kids. 
Marcie May said she was upset the city sanctioned an event involving men dressed in drag at a public library. 
"They like to dress up to promote their sexual agenda," May said. "It has no business, it has no business in a public setting." 
Police ended up kicking May out of the library after she caused a disturbance during the event.





Sources
The Guardian
Houston, Texas
Houston, Texas
Leander, Texas
Bristol, Rhode Island
Waterville, Maine
Rockford, Illinois
Brooklyn
Bristol, Rhode Island
Spokane, Washington

GET ME REWRITE: TV Showman sticks with what (a) worked before and (b) quickly wore out its welcome


Print edition headline:  
TV Showman Sticks With What's Worked Before

Source:  Wikipedia

"The Apprentice" peaked in its 1st season and started to tank after its 3rd.

Trump 2016 Returns, This Time as Nostalgia Act.  (The New York Times, 6/19/2019) 
But, filled with callbacks, fan favorites and references to moments from its first season, it was more rerun than re-imagination. Mr. Trump’s 2016-campaign announcement, four years ago, was full of imagery to remind people of his long celebrity career. He was backed by the pink marble of Trump Tower, the site of so many of his ’80s photo shoots; he glided down its escalator in an image familiar from “The Apprentice.” 

 
Original 1/25/2017 post, "Donald Trump, alternative facts, and 'The Celebrity Apprentice':  Nowhere near #1", starts here.


Reported in For Trump, Everything is a Rating.  (The New York Times, 1/24/2017)

Not even close to being a top-rated show.

Source:  Wikipedia


Disappearing cities and villages of the Buckeye State UPDATE: Lakewood, Ohio


It all started here.


Reported in Lakewood Makes List Of Ohio's Most Livable Cities.  (Lakewood Patch, 6/24/2019)


Cleveland and its inner-ring suburbs with largest population loss.


East and west of I-77.

Other population loss series:
Original 3/8/2019 post starts here.

That's not the story of Cleveland Heights, Lakewood and similar older, more substantial suburbs. Developed earlier and with grand architecture -- Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Neoclassical -- the homes were larger and more solid from the start. Both Cleveland suburbs were incorporated as villages in 1903. And they had a kind of classic appeal – the kind that many suburbs built after 1945 lacked, says John Rennie Short, a University of Maryland professor who studies urban issues and public policy. A family, often on the cusp of affluence, could move in and stay put.

Source:  Wikipedia

Lakewood's population peaked at 70,509 in 1930.  Its 2017 estimated population is 50,249 -- a drop of 20,260 (29%).


Incorporated as a village in 1902 and a city in 1911, the City of Lakewood is a western inner-ring suburb of Cleveland.  



Other disappearing cities of the Buckeye State:
Akron. (2/28/2019)
Brook Park (3/3/2019)
Cambridge.  (2/27/2019)
Canton.  (3/1/2019)
Cleveland.  (1/2/2019)
Cleveland Heights.  (3/5/2019)
East Cleveland. (3/2/2019)
East Liverpool.  (2/18/2019)
Euclid.  (3/4/2019)
Gallipolis.  (2/23/2019)
Garfield Heights (3/6/2019)
Ironton.  (2/24/2019)
Maple Heights, 3/7/2019)
Martins Ferry.  (2/21/2019)
Pomeroy.  (2/22/2019)
Portsmouth.  (2/25/2019)
Steubenville.  (2/20/2019)
Warren.  (1/18/2019)
Youngstown.  (1/9/2019)
Zanesville.  (2/26/2019)

Disappearing cities and boroughs of the Keystone State



Aliquippa.  (1/12/2019)
Ambridge.  (1/17/2019)
Arnold.  (1/18/2019)
Braddock.  (1/19/2019)
Bradford, (1/20/2019)
Carbondale.  (1/21/2019)
Charleroi.  (1/22/2019)
Chester.  (1/23/2019)
Clairton.  (1/24/2019)
Coraopolis.  (1/25/2019)
Dickson City.  (1/26/2019)
Donora.  (1/27/2019)
Duquesne.  (1/28/2019)
Farrell.  (1/29/2019)
Harrisburg.  (2/12/2019)
Homestead.  (1/30/2019)
Johnstown.  (1/6/2019)
McKees Rocks.  (1/31/2019)
McKeesport.  (2/1/2019)
Monessen.  (2/2/2019)
Nanticoke.  (2/3/2019)
New Castle.  (2/4/2019)
New Kensington.  (2/5/2019)
Oil City.  (2/6/2019)
Pittsburgh.  (1/13/2019)
Pittston. (2/7/2019)
Scranton.  (1/14/2019)
Shamokin.  (2/8/2019)
Sharon.  (2/9/2019)
Steelton.  (2/11/2019)
Swissvale.  (2/13/2019)
Titusville.  (2/10/2019)
Uniontown.  (2/14/2019)
Washington.  (2/15/2019)
Willkes-Barre.  (2/16/2019)
Wiklinsburg.  (2/17/2018)

Other U.S. disappearing cities


Baltimore, Maryland.  (12/31/2018)
Benton Harbor, Michigan.  (1/15/2019)
Buffalo, New York, (1/8/2019)
Cairo, Illinois.   (1/5/2019)
Detroit, Michigan.  (1/1/2019)
East St. Louis, Illinois.  (1/11/2019)
Flint, Michigan.  (1/7/2019)
Gary, Indiana.  (1/4/2019)
St. Louis, Missouri.  (1/2/2019)
Wheeling, West Virginia.  (1/16/2019)