Saturday, May 4, 2019

Check out the latest nonsense from Trump Official Polling Team



Source of line graph: You are receiving this email [from] Trump Make America Great Again Committee, 138 Conant Street, 2nd Floor, Beverly, MA 01915

Y'all remember Don Martin, right?

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Gosper County


Source:  Wikipedia (Gosper County, Elwood)


Elwood is the county seat of Gosper County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 24.1% - Gosper County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 23.2% - Gosper County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Gosper County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1932. (Barry Goldwater won by 3.3 percentage points in 1964, and George Wallace received 5.8% of the vote in 1968.)

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trenton.  (5/3/2019)
Logan County/Stapleton.  (5/3/2019)
Keya Paha County/Springview.  (5/4/2019)
Brown County/Ainsworth.  (5/4/2019)
Custer County/Broken Bow.  (5/4/2019)

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Custer County


Source:  Wikipedia (Custer County, Broken Bow)


Broken Bow is the county seat of Custer County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 21.7% - Custer County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 22.0% - Custer County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Custer County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1932. (Barry Goldwater won by 6 percentage points in 1964, and George Wallace received 6.5% of the vote in 1968.)


Related reading:
School Consolidation in Nebraska: EconomicEfficiency vs. Rural Community Life.  (Online Journal of Rural Research and Policy, 2011)

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trenton.  (5/3/2019)
Logan County/Stapleton.  (5/3/2019)
Keya Paha County/Springview.  (5/4/2019)
Brown County/Ainsworth.  (5/4/2019)

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Blaine County


Source:  Wikipedia (Blaine County, Brewster)


Brewster is the county seat of Blaine County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 24.2% - Blaine County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 24.1% - Blaine County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Blaine County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1932. (Barry Goldwater won by 25.2 percentage points in 1964, and George Wallace received 5.8% of the vote in 1968.)

Related reading:
Reconnaissance Survey Final Report of Blaine County, Nebraska prepared for Nebraska State Historical Society State Historic Preservation Office.  (1989)

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trenton.  (5/3/2019)
Logan County/Stapleton.  (5/3/2019)
Keya Paha County/Springview.  (5/4/2019)
Brown County/Ainsworth.  (5/4/2019)

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Brown County


Source:  Wikipedia (Brown County, Ainsworth)


Ainsworth is the county seat of Brown County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 18.2% - Brown County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 25.2% - Brown County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Brown County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1932. (Barry Goldwater won by 18 percentage points in 1964, and George Wallace received 8.7% of the vote in 1968.)


Related reading:
Residents focused on enhancing quality of life.  (Norfolk Daily News, 10/25/2017)
Brown County has many other positives in its own right. The Sandhills are considered to be one of the most beautiful regions of Nebraska, while others prefer the county’s insulation urban areas. The county also offers many other amenities, including a solid selection of restaurants and a hospital.

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trenton.  (5/3/2019)
Logan County/Stapleton.  (5/3/2019)
Keya Paha County/Springview.  (5/4/2019)

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Keya Paha County


Source:  Wikipedia (Keya Paha County, Springview)


Springview is the county seat of Keya Paha County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 20.6% - Keya Paha County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 29.6% - Keya Paha County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The one and only time Keya Paha County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1916. (Barry Goldwater won by 23.6 percentage points in 1964, and George Wallace received 7.3% of the vote in 1968.)

Keya Paha County Library

Related reading:
Banker, football coach dedicated to help Springview thrive.  Norfolk Daily News, 10/16/2018)
Keya Paha County, nestled between the Niobrara and Missouri rivers, is one of Nebraska’s least populated counties, with an estimated 790 people. Like many rural counties, it has seen a dramatic population decrease over the past century. 
Combating the population decline is key reason why the foundation fund was created, and many of its projects seek to create more opportunities for residents.

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trenton.  (5/3/2019)
Logan County/Stapleton.  (5/3/2019)

Friday, May 3, 2019

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Thomas County


Source:  Wikipedia (Thomas County, Thedford)


Thedford is the county seat of Thomas County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts

Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 29.0% - Thomas County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 24.6% - Thomas County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Thomas County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1936. (Barry Goldwater won by 20.2 percentage points in 1964, and George Wallace received 6.7% of the vote in 1968.)


Thomas County Library, Thedford

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trenton.  (5/3/2019)
Logan County/Stapleton.  (5/3/2019)

Population loss in rural Nebraska: Logan County


Source:  Wikipedia (Logan County, Stockville)

Stapleton is the county seat of Logan County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 22.7% - Logan County
  • 30.6% - Nebraska
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 21.5% - Logan County
  • 15.4% - Nebraska
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Logan County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1964. (George Wallace received 9.9% of the vote in 1968.)



Related reading:
Comparing Nebraska Population Change by Race and Ethnicity.  (Uniersity of Nebraska-Omaha, 9/17/2017)
When studying population change in Nebraska during the 2000s decade, it is clear that county level changes were far from uniform. While the state increased by about 115,000 people, only 24 of the state’s 93 counties experienced a population gain. Nearly 75% of Nebraska’s counties had a population decline during the decade, one of the largest such percentages of counties among all states in the Midwest and Great Plains areas of the United States.

Related posts (down and up from northwest to southeast)
Sioux County/Harrison.  (4/29/2019)
Banner County/Harrisburg.  (4/29/2019)
Kimball County/Kimball.  (4/29/2019)
Morrill County/Bridgeport.  (4/30/2019)
Sheridan County/Rushville.  (4/30/2019)
Garden County/Oshkosh.  (4/30/2019)
Deuel County/Chappell.  (4/30/2019)
Dundy County/Benkelman.  (5/1/2019)
Perkins County/Grant.  (5/1/2019)
Arthur County/Arthur.  (5/1/2019)
Grant County/Hyannis.  (5/1/2019)
Cherry County/Valentine.  (5/2/2019)
Hooker County/Mullen.  (5/2/2019)
McPherson County/Tryon.  (5/2/2019)
Hayes County/Hayes Center.  (5/3/2019)
Hitchcock County/Trentonhttps://paulsnewsline.blogspot.com/2019/05/population-loss-in-rural-nebraska_3.html.  (5/3/2019)

UPDATE. How much longer will Kewaunee County residents take this shit?


Wisconsin State Journal, 4/17/2019


GOP lawmakers don't expect you to change your voting habits, which is why they can boldly support CAFO special interests.

You still don't get it, do you?


3/1/2019 update, "Greetings from Kewaunee County, home to 20,405 people, 97,000 cows/heifers/calves, and a shitload of polluted water wells", starts here.

Graphic from WisContext

11/7/2018 update, " Kewaunee County voters beg to be slapped around by Scott Walker for another four years", starts here.


Source:  Wikipedia (presidential, gubernatorial 20102014,, 2018)

2014-2018 increase in Democratic vote totals:    6.4%
2014-2018 increase in Republican vote totals:    0.2%

2008-2010 drop in Democratic vote totals:  43.3%
2008-2010 drop in Republican vote totals:    0.8%
2012-2014 drop in Democratic vote totals:  34.9%
2012-2014 drop in Republican vote totals:    1.3%
2016-2018 drop in Democratic vote totals:    1.5%
2016-2018 drop in Republican vote totals:  11.1%


Original 11/5/2018 post, "Will Kewaunee County voters get snookered a third time and vote for Scott Walker?  ", starts here.

2010 source:  US election atlas
2014 source:  Politico

2/24/2018 Get me rewrite UPDATE: "Owner of Kewaunee County CAFO dies in Indiana plane crash", starts here./

Title card source:  Wisconsin Watch
Map source:  Groundwater contamination susceptibility map (USGS)

Reported in Prominent Wisconsin dairy farmer killed when Green Bay-bound plane crashes in Indiana.  (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2/23/2018)



Related reading:
Letter to the Editor: Weidner’s “Pagel Paradox”.  (Door County Daily News, 9/18/2017) 
Living near CAFO reduces property value, DOR rules.  (Wisconsin State Farmer, 11/27/2017)
Dairy industry icon among those killed in plane crash in Indiana.  (Madison.com, 2/23/2018)


1/25/2018 update, "The Trump effect has Scott Walker and his WI GOP minions running scared in this election year (the CAFO/Kewaunee County/tainted groundwater edition)", starts here.

Source of CAFOs map:  Sustain Rural Wisconsin Network



11/9/2017 update, "UPDATE. Dear Kewaunee County residents, Don't drink the water!", starts here.


Reported in Walker proposal to alter large farm regulation alarms environmentalists.  (Capital Times, 10/27/2017)

DATCP = Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, but Scott Walker has clearly shown he has absolutely no interest in the CP.  


9/9/2016 update, "WI DNR secretary Cathy Stepp stands by her CAFO dairymen", starts here.


Quoted in Farms to subsidize cost of safe drinking water for those with tainted wells.  (Madison.com, 9/8/2016)


5/5/2016 update, " Manure 101: A typical dairy cow produces 148 pounds per day", starts here.

Source of title statistic:  University of Wisconsin-Green Bay


Source: Kewaunee County Cow Count increases to 98,000.  (Green Bay Press-Gazette, 9/12/2015)

Consequently, these headlines should come as no surprise.

As usual Ms. Stepp arrives late to the party.  On Monday, DNR Secretary released an editorial to news organizations saying her agency, in addition to the efforts of work groups, is taking steps to address water issues in and around the county.
With so much manure being spread on the landscape, Luft said the results are a sign that manure is the likely source of the tainted wells.


Original 11/15/2015 post, "Dear Kewaunee County, You voted for him, now you're paying the consequences", starts here.

Yup, your county is 'open for business'.

Something's in the water in Kewaunee County, Wisconsin.  (Aljazeera America, 11/13/2015)
CAFOs in Wisconsin require a permit from the state Department of Natural Resources, which under Gov. Scott Walker’s leadership has appointed a secretary lauded for her chamber of commerce approach to natural resources. The current DNR administration has lower enforcement rates than under previous governors, and has faced budget and staff cuts.  [emphasis added]

Related posts:
Scott Walker telegraphs that Wisconsin DNR will likely ignore UW, USDA and other findings. (11/14/2015)
September 2015 UPDATE: On June 6, 2014, employees of Michael, Best & Friedrich donated $28,046.81 to Scott Walker and $500 to Mary Burke.  (9/17/2015)
Kewaunee County's CAFO concentration.  (10/23/2014)

Dear William Barr, PIease re-read your job description. Best, Retiring Guy


You do not serve as Donald Trump's personal lawyer.


Related reading:
William Barr Is Acting as Trump’s Defense Lawyer, Not Attorney General.  (The Nation, 5/1/2019)
If William Barr is Trump’s lawyer, then who’s representing America?  (Los Angeles Times, 5/2/2019)

GET ME REWRITE: Who will defend Ward, June, Wally, and the Beaver? (part 3)


The op-ed that keeps on giving.


Young adult are waiting longer to get married, ergo, thi will obviously result in more never-married adults.


Rising Share of Never-Married Adults, 1960-2012

Since Helen is cherry-picking here, I'll add some context from Pew.
But delayed marriage may not explain all of the drop-off. The share of Americans who have never married has been rising steadily in recent decades. At the same time, more adults are living with a partner instead of marrying and raising children outside of marriage. Marriage rates are also more closely linked to socio-economic status than ever before, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau da that shows that the education gap in marital status has continued to widen.  (Trends in the Share of Never-Married Americans and a Look Forward, 9/24/2014)


Source:   As U.S. marriage rate hovers at 50%, education gap in marital status widens.  (Pew Research Center, 9/17/2017)



5/1/2019 update.

More from our supply and demand pundit, Helen Andrews, as opined in "Who Will Defend the American Family?"

The mass entry of women into the work force is one reason for this financial insecurity. Ms. Warren said as much in her book, [Ms. Andrews source?  Tucker Carlson] although she has since backed away from such a politically explosive suggestion. Those of us who don’t have a Democratic primary ahead of us can say what she won’t: When mothers started entering paid employment in large numbers in the 1970s, it led to a bidding war over middle-class amenities that left everyone paying more for the privilege of being no better off than before.
Throughout this op-ed piece, she offers nothing to back up her pronouncements.

I don't see any evidence of a mass entry in this graph.



The percentage of men and women in the civilian work force has remained stable during the past 3 decades.




Original 5/1/2019 post starts here.

Take your pick of headlines!
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Op-ed piece by Helen Adams in the 4/28/2019 Sunday Review section of The New York Times.

Photo credit:  Muck Rake
(text emphasis added)

Reported in With heroes including Donald Trump, meet conservatism's new, telegenic talking heads.  (Sydney Morning Herald, 4/8/2017)

Helen Andrews word of the day