Monday, July 6, 2020

Wisconsin 2020 elections: Who's running in the 3rd Assembly District



Ron Tusler (R-Menasha) was elected to the Assembly in November 2015.  Two years later, he won a 2nd term by a margin of 14.8 percentage points.  He recently revealed his contempt for the Black Lives Matter movement.


Emily Voight is the Democratic challenger.



Source:  Ballotpedia

The art of the Wisconsin GOP gerrymander
Source:  Ballotpedia

2020 Wisconsin election posts:
14th Senate District.  (2/24/2020)
16th Senate District.  (1/28/2020)
26th Senate District.  (4/4/2020)
30th Senate District.  (1/18/2020)

1st Assembly District.  (5/8/2020)
2nd Assembly District.  (7/5/2020)
3rd Assembly District.  (7/6/2020)
29th Assembly District.  (2/21/2020)
35th Assembly District.  (5/25/2020)
44th Assembly District.  (2/21/2020)
48th Assembly District.  (3/12/2020)
63rd Assembly District.  (5/29/2020)
67th Assembly District.  (5/4/2020)
69th Assembly District.  (1/16/2020)
76th Assembly District.  (5/13/2020)
82nd Assembly District.  (5/13/2020)
96th Assembly District.  (5/3/2020)

Week by week: COVID-19 cases in Mississippi


Total tests (positive and negative) as of 7/5:  310,141 -- a one-week increase of 29,953 compared to 41,473 on 6/29.  

New cases week by week:
  • Jun 29-Jul 5:  5,008  (down 5% from previous week; testing down 28% from previous week)
  • June 22-28:     5,251  (up 367% from previous week)
  • June 15-21:      1,125 (down 50% from previous week)
  • June 8-14:        2,246  (up 27% from previous week)
  • June 1-7;          1,769  (down 13% from previous week)
  • May 25-31:       2,033  (down 6% from previous week)
  • May 18-24:       2,162  (up 20% from previous week)
  • May 11-17:       1,795
  • May 4-10:         1,951
  • Apr 26-May 3:  1,639
  • April 19-25:      1,637 
  • April 12-18:      1,493
  • April 5-11:        1,143







COVID-19 deaths are projected to peak in Mississippi on April 24.   Total projected deaths:  369.  (NPR)  As of 7/5, the state has recorded 1,111 deaths.




Deaths reported:
  • As of March 22 -        1
  • As of March 29 -      14  (+  13)
  • As of April     5 -      43  (+  29)
  • As of April   12 -      96  (+  53)
  • As of April   19 -    159  (+  63)
  • As of April   26 -    227  (+  68)
  • As of May      3 -    303  (+  76)
  • As of May    10 -    430  (+127)
  • As of May    17 -    521  (+  91)
  • As of May    24 -    635  (+124)
  • As of May    31 -    734  (+  99)
  • As of June      7 -    817  (+  83)
  • As of June    14 -    891  (+  74)
  • As of June    21 -    938  (+  47)
  • As of June    28 - 1,039  (+101)
  • As of July       5 - 1,111  (+  72)

Related posts:
Alabama.  (7/6/2020)
Arizona.  (7/6/2020)
Arkansas.  (7/2/2020)
California.  (7/5/2020)
Connecticut.  (7/3/2020)
Florida.  (7/6/2020)
Georgia.  (7/6/2020)
Idaho.  (7/5/2020)
Illinois.  (6/30/2020)
Indiana.  (6/27/2020)
Iowa.  (7/3/2020)
Kansas.  (7/2/2020)
Kentucky.  (7/2/2020)
Louisiana.  (7/4/2020)
Maryland.  (7/1/2020)
Massachusetts.  (6/30/2020)
Michigan.  (6/30/2020)
Minnesota.  (7/2/2020)
Mississippi.  (7/6/2020)
Montana. (7/3/2020)
Nebraska.  (7/2/2020)
Nevada.  (7/1/2020)
New Jersey,  (6/30/2020)
New York.  (6/30/2020)
North Carolina.  (7/5/2020)
North Dakota.  (7/5/2020)
Ohio.  (7/4/2020)
Pennsylvania.  (6/30/2020)
South Carolina.  (7/1/2020)
South Dakota.  (7/2/2020)
Tennessee.  (7/3/2020)
Texas   (7/4/2020)
Utah.  (6/30/2020)
Virginia.  (7/3/2020)
Washington State.  (6/12/2020)
West Virginia.  (7/1/2020)
Wisconsin.  (7/5/2020)

Week by week: COVID-19 cases in Georgia


Total tests (positive and negative) as of 7/5:  949,185 -- a one-week increase of 142,247 compared 108,631 on 6/28.

New cases week by week:
  • Jun 29-Jul 5:  18,306  (up 37% from previous week) 
  • June 22-28:    13,401  (up 119% from previous week)  
  • June 15-21:      6,128  (up 6% from previous week)
  • June 8-14:        5,783  (up 18% from previous week)
  • June 1-7:          4,912  (up 18% from previous week)
  • May 25-31:       4,148  (down 19% from previous week)
  • May 18-24:       5,137  (up 13% from previous week)
  • May 11-17:       4,560
  • May 4-10:         5,135
  • Apr 26-May 3:   4,905
  • April 19-25:       5,100
  • April 12-18:      5,849
  • April 5-11:         5,805
  • Mar 29-Apr 4:   3,996


Georgia Department of Public Health
(perhaps the worst dashboard of any state; not worth updating)


COVID-19 deaths in Georgia are projected to peak on April 21.  Total projected deaths: 2,630.  (NPR)  As of 7/5, Georgia has recorded 2,860 deaths.



Deaths reported:
  • As of March 15 -          1
  • As of March 22 -        23
  • As of March 29 -        80  (+  57)
  • As of April     5 -      211  (+131)
  • As of April   12 -      433  (+222)
  • As of April   19 -      687  (+254)
  • As of April   26 -      912  (+225 )
  • As of May      3 -   1,177  (+265)
  • As of May    10 -   1,405  (+228)
  • As of May    17 -   1,606  (+201)
  • As of May    24 -   1,811  (+205)
  • As of May    31 -   2,042  (+231)
  • As of June     7 -    2,180  (+138 )
  • As of June   14 -   2,451  (+271)
  • As of June   21 -   2,643  (+192)
  • As of June   28 -   2,778  (+145)
  • As of July     5 -    2,860  (+  92)

Related reading:
Gov. Kemp’s says restaurants can operate at full capacity; conventions set to resume.  (Altanta Business Chronicle, 6/12/2020)
Some public health experts question the governor's decision to continue loosening the coronavirus guidelines, saying current data shows an increase in Covid-19 cases since May 1, with spikes occurring in smaller counties outside metro Atlanta.
As Georgia reopens, is it creating a model for America?  (Christian Science Monitor, 5/26/2020)
That hesitancy may have helped, public health officials say. Georgia’s rolling seven-day average of new cases has declined, according to the Department of Public Health, down from nearly 728 on May 19 to 308 on May 25. Other tallies show the number of cases running flat, despite an increase in the state’s testing rate. That improvement comes as Georgia state officials apologized last week for adding faulty data that made its decline look more pronounced, citing a processing error. And in neighboring Florida, data scientist Rebekah Jones, who handled the state’s COVID-19 dashboard, claims that she was fired for refusing to fudge numbers in order to support the state’s reopening plan.

Related posts:
Alabama.  (7/6/2020)
Arizona.  (7/6/2020)
Arkansas.  (7/2/2020)
California.  (7/5/2020)
Connecticut.  (7/3/2020)
Florida.  (7/6/2020)
Georgia.  (7/6/2020)
Idaho.  (7/5/2020)
Illinois.  (6/30/2020)
Indiana.  (6/27/2020)
Iowa.  (7/3/2020)
Kansas.  (7/2/2020)
Kentucky.  (7/2/2020)
Louisiana.  (7/4/2020)
Maryland.  (7/1/2020)
Massachusetts.  (6/30/2020)
Michigan.  (6/30/2020)
Minnesota.  (7/2/2020)
Mississippi.  (6.29/2020)
Montana. (7/3/2020)
Nebraska.  (7/2/2020)
Nevada.  (7/1/2020)
New Jersey,  (6/30/2020)
New York.  (6/30/2020)
North Carolina.  (7/5/2020)
North Dakota.  (7/5/2020)
Ohio.  (7/4/2020)
Pennsylvania.  (6/30/2020)
South Carolina.  (7/1/2020)
South Dakota.  (7/2/2020)
Tennessee.  (7/3/2020)
Texas   (7/4/2020)
Utah.  (6/30/2020)
Virginia.  (7/3/2020)
Washington State.  (6/12/2020)
West Virginia.  (7/1/2020)
Wisconsin.  (7/5/2020)

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (5/4/2020)

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (5/1/2020)
Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/28/2020)

Related reading:
Reopening Has Begun. No One Is Sure What Happens Next.  (The New York Times, 4/25/2020)
South Carolina, for example, looks likely to be among the first states to allow widespread reopening of businesses. But if a manufacturer there depends on a part made in Ohio, where the virus is still spreading, it may not be able to resume production, regardless of the rules. 
“We live in an economy where there are lots of interconnections between different sectors,” said Joseph S. Vavra, an economist at the University of Chicago. “Saying you want to reopen gradually is more easily said than done.”

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/22/2020)


Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/20/2020)

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/18/2020)

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/16/2020)

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/14/2020)


Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/12/2020)

Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/10/2020)


Related reading:
Atlanta Journal Constitution headlines (4/9/2020)


The next coronavirus hot spots are in states that aren’t testing enough.  (Politico, 3/31/2020)
Georgia playing catch up in coronavirus testing.  (Atlanta Journal Constitution, 4/1/2020)

BREAKING: Georgia governor to order shelter in place to curb coronavirus.  (Atlanta Journal Constitution, 4/1/2020)
Kemp had balked at more stringent restrictions to combat the disease, in part because he was worried more severe bans would cripple the economy in parts of the state where there are few known cases of the disease.
But he reversed course on Wednesday as a growing number of other Republican governors, including the leaders of Florida, Texas and South Carolina, instituted broader limits on mobility and shuttered more business to try to counter the disease.
Was curious was to why Dougherty County is Georgia's only hot spot outside metro Atlanta.




‘Explosive spread’ of coronavirus in Georgia likely to worsen.  (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 3/28/2020)
“The media and some in the medical profession are peddling these doomsday models and projections,” Kemp’s top aide, Tim Fleming, wrote Saturday. “This has in turn resulted in people panicking and local governments across our state overreacting. As a result of their overreach, many small businesses will struggle and some will not reopen.”
  [emphasis added] 
Fleming’s remarks appear to conflict with the position of the state’s own public health officials, who say the outbreak is likely to worsen without aggressive social distancing measures.


Week by week: COVID-19 cases in Florida


Total tests (positive and negative) as of 7/5:  2,200,199 -- a one-week increase of 319,302 compared to 282,611 on 6/28.

New cases week by week:
  • Jun 29-Jul 5:  59,036 (up 35% from previous week)
  • June 22-28:    43,804  (up 102% from previous week)
  • June 15-21:    21,703  (up 87% from previous week)
  • June 8-14:      11,630  (up 50% from previous week)
  • June 1-7:          7,775  (up 47% from previous week)
  • May 25-31:        5,296  (up 0.3% from previous week)
  • May 18-24:        5,279  (up 6% from previous week)
  • May 11-17:        4,992
  • May 4-10:          4,518
  • Apr 26-May 3:    4,450
  • April 19-25:        5,632
  • April 12-18:        6,641
  • April 5-11:          7,204





COVID-19 deaths in Florida are projected to peak on April 21.  Total projected deaths: 6,770.  (NPR)  As of 6/14, Florida has recorded 3,022 deaths.

Deaths reported:
  • As of March 8   -          0 
  • As of March 15 -          4
  • As of March 22 -        13
  • As of March 29 -        56  (+  43)
  • As of April     5 -      215  (+159)
  • As of April   12 -      465  (+250)
  • As of April   19 -      781  (+316)
  • As of April   26 -   1,094  (+313 )
  • As of May      3 -   1,402  (+308)
  • As of May    10 -   1,791  (+389)
  • As of May    17 -   2,049  (+257)
  • As of May    24 -   2,316  (+267)
  • As of May    31 -   2,534  (+218)
  • As of June      7 -   2,700  (+166)
  • As of June    14 -   3,022  (+322)
  • As of June    21 -   3,254  (+232)
  • As of June    28 -   3,518  (+264)
  • As of July      5 -    3,832 (+314)

Related reading:
Florida has reported more new coronavirus cases in 8 days than Louisiana has in total.  (nola.com, 7/4/2020)
Florida officials and health experts are worried that people will gather over the holiday weekend and spread the virus through close contact. They’ve tried to mitigate spread by shutting bars statewide. Some regional attractions, such as Zoo Miami and Jungle Island, have closed. Universal Studios in Orlando is open.
Reopening reverses course in Texas and Florida as coronavirus cases spike .  (Washington Post, 6/26/2020)
In Washington, Vice President Pence attempted to put a positive spin on the situation, claiming “remarkable progress” despite a surge in cases. “ 
As we stand here today, all 50 states and territories across the country are opening up, and safely and responsibly,” Pence said. 
At the same time, Abbott and DeSantis announced they would reverse course. The governors — both prominent supporters of Trump — had moved swiftly to lift lockdowns, even as some local leaders pleaded with them to keep restrictions in place.
Coronavirus cases spike in Florida as Trump preps for convention in state.  (ABC News, 6/13/2020)
Rebekah Jones was fired last month from her job at the Florida Department of Health, where she helped create a data portal about the state's COVID-19 cases. Now, she has created a dashboard of her own. 
In some ways, Jones' new portal for Florida coronavirus data looks a lot like the state health department's. But it has a few key differences that reflect just how contentious coronavirus data has become amid politicized arguments about whether it's safe for states to reopen. 
Case in point: Jones' dashboard has a map that shows which Florida counties are ready for the next phase of reopening. By her calculations, only two of the state's 67 counties at the moment meet the state's criteria for further easing restrictions.

Florida reports more than 1,000 coronavirus cases for the fifth day in a row.  (Tampa Bay Times, 6/7/2020) 

In another measure of the coronavirus’ impact, the Department of Health reported that 10,942 people have been hospitalized statewide for treatment of the COVID-19 infection since March 1. That’s an additional 51 hospitalizations since Saturday, raising the overall count to 10,942. 
More than half of the positive COVID-19 cases being tracked by state health officials are in South Florida, with Miami-Dade County continuing to lead the state in both numbers of confirmed cases and coronavirus-related deaths. According to state data, the number of people infected in Miami-Dade has increased to 19,547 and the virus has claimed as many 765 lives.
After reopening, Florida hasn’t seen a spike in coronavirus cases. Are we in the clear?   (Tampa Bay Times, 5/29/2020)

“As mobility increased, we haven’t seen a spike in daily infections like we would have expected to see right now,” said Ali Mokdad, professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington. “We are puzzled by it.”
Early signs offer hope that Floridians are acting carefully as they return to public life, health specialists say, but they also warn it’s too early to draw firm conclusions. A surge remains possible, especially as people grow more comfortable and potentially complacent.
“It’s like a smoldering fire and when the conditions are ripe, it just takes off,” said Dr. Marissa Levine, director of the Center for Leadership in Public Health Practice at the University of South Florida. “A second wave isn’t something that happens right away.” 
Coronavirus hot spots erupt across the country; experts warn of second wave in South.  (Washington Post, 5/20/2020)
Florida's Complete Phase 1 Reopening Happens As COVID-19 Cases Rise .  (NPR, 5/18/2020)

Related posts:
Alabama.  (7/6/2020)
Arizona.  (7/6/2020)
Arkansas.  (7/2/2020)
California.  (7/5/2020)
Connecticut.  (7/3/2020)
Florida.  (7/6/2020)
Georgia.  (6/29/2020)
Idaho.  (7/5/2020)
Illinois.  (6/30/2020)
Indiana.  (6/27/2020)
Iowa.  (7/3/2020)
Kansas.  (7/2/2020)
Kentucky.  (7/2/2020)
Louisiana.  (7/4/2020)
Maryland.  (7/1/2020)
Massachusetts.  (6/30/2020)
Michigan.  (6/30/2020)
Minnesota.  (7/2/2020)
Mississippi.  (6.29/2020)
Montana. (7/3/2020)
Nebraska.  (7/2/2020)
Nevada.  (7/1/2020)
New Jersey,  (6/30/2020)
New York.  (6/30/2020)
North Carolina.  (7/5/2020)
North Dakota.  (7/5/2020)
Ohio.  (7/4/2020)
Pennsylvania.  (6/30/2020)
South Carolina.  (7/1/2020)
South Dakota.  (7/2/2020)
Tennessee.  (7/3/2020)
Texas   (7/4/2020)
Utah.  (6/30/2020)
Virginia.  (7/3/2020)
Washington State.  (6/12/2020)
West Virginia.  (7/1/2020)
Wisconsin.  (7/5/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (5/11/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (5/4/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/27/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/27/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/24/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/22/2020)



Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/20/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/18/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/16/2020)
Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/14/2020)



Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/12/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/10/2020)

Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/9/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/8/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/7/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/6/2020)


Screenshot of Tampa Bay Times headlines (4/5/2020)
(text box, arrow, highlight added; link to article)


Related reading:
For most Florida hotel guests, it’s past checkout time. But not for DeSantis’ top donor.  
Miami Herald, 4/2/2020)
Kenneth Griffin, the 38th-richest American and the biggest backer of DeSantis’ 2018 gubernatorial campaign, has quietly flown in traders and staff from New York and Chicago to set up shop with him in the Four Seasons Resort Palm Beach, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the arrangement. 

Too little, too late?

Florida has not issued a statewide stay-at-home order amid coronavirus crisis. Some support Gov. Ron DeSantis' approach. Others don't.   (USA Today, 3/31/2020)
Until we do more widespread community testing, we won’t really know who has been exposed,” [Dr. Marissa] Levine [professor of public health and family medicine at the University of South Florida at Tampa] said. From her standpoint, she said, the governor should set restrictions across the state. “From a public health standpoint, there is no question that the earlier you do it the better.” 
Florida’s large senior population, the age group hit hardest by COVID-19, is another reason to go to a statewide lockdown, Levine added. A stay-at-home order would signal to people, even in counties with few or no cases, that people need to change their normal behavior. 
“When you don’t have such an order in place, I worry people may not be as cautious or [not] go about their hand-washing and social distancing,” Levine said.  

‘It’s catastrophic.’ Coronavirus forces Florida farmers to scrap food they can’t sell.  (Miami Herald, 3/31/2020)
The total shutdown of the hospitality industry, to stem the spread of the coronavirus, means farmers who grew crops intended for everyone from small, independent restaurants to busy hotels are stuck with millions of pounds of produce that will soon be left to die on the vine. And even food banks, soup kitchens and rescue missions, which have seen a surge of unemployed workers making hours-long lines for boxes of donated fresh fruits and vegetables, are saturated with farm donations. 

News from the Trump fanboy front:
Florida governor blocks Miami Herald, Tampa Bay Times from coronavirus press conference.  (Miami Herald, 3/28/2020)

Related reading:
Will spring breakers become super-spreaders?  (Politico, 3/21/2020)
For much of this week, revelers continued to cram four and five to a hotel room, swarm beaches over hundreds of miles of coastline, and then gather shoulder-to-shoulder in bars and clubs – almost a model process for spreading contagious diseases.
University of Tampa says students on spring break together tested positive for COVID-19.  (Miami Herald, 3/22/2020)
The University of Tampa announced Saturday that it was the latest Florida college or university touched by the coronavirus pandemic via five students who tested positive for COVID-19. 
The school’s Saturday evening Twitter posting said the students had been on Spring Break together with other schoolmates. What the post didn’t say was where the students went on Spring Break or where they lived on or off campus.
While the world partied some places prepared. Will their coronavirus gamble pay off?  (Miami Herald, 3/26/2020)
While spring-breakers were still cramming South Beach bars earlier this month, Puerto Rico’s government was trying to turn the tourism-dependent island into an inhospitable fortress.