Saturday, May 11, 2019

Population loss in rural Kansas: Decatur County


Source:  Wikipedia (Dccatur County, Oberlin)


Oberlin is the county seat of Decatur County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 21.9% - Decatur County
  • 32.3% - Kansas
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 27.7% - Decatur County
  • 15.4% - Kansas
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Decatur County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1936. (Barry Goldwaster won by a margin of 2.5 percentage points over LBJ.  George Wallace received 8.4% of the vote in 1968.)


Other Kansas population loss posts:
Cheyenne County/St. Francis.  (5/10/2019)
Rawlins County/Atwood.  (5/10/2019)

Dear Alice, There is no escape from the opioid epidemic. Best, Retiring Guy



Sheboygan leaders say apparent overdose death at library is wake up call. (WTMJ, 5/10/2019)
A public library is a place where everyone should feel safe and welcome, but in the same building where kids find something new to read, police say a man likely overdosed on heroin in the bathroom. 
“My 7-year-old comes here and I’d be mad if I seen some stuff like that,” said Alice Ingram. Ingram thought she moved away from this type of behavior only to find the opioid crisis impacts in smaller communities as well. 
“I came from Milwaukee before I came here and I like the fact that my kids can run around and I don’t have to worry about them, for that to happen, they just need to crack down on the drugs, it’s ridiculous,” she said. 

Q:  What drugs are opioids? 
A:   Examples of opioids are: Painkillers such as; morphine, methadone, Buprenorphine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone. Heroin is also an opioid and is illegal.

Well, Brent, it's clear what Iowa needs to do in November 2020



Sources:  Wikipedia (election results)

Map:  CNN

Reported in 'It can't get any worse': Iowa farmers suffer as U.S. trade war with China escalates.  (Des Moines Register, 5/10/2019)

Related reading:
Trump is Terrible for Rural America, by Paul Krugman.  (The New York Times, 5/9/2019)
What, after all, is Trumpism? In 2016 Trump pretended to be a different kind of Republican, but in practice almost all of his economic agenda has been G.O.P. standard: big tax cuts for corporations and the rich while hacking away at the social safety net. The one big break from orthodoxy has been his protectionism, his eagerness to start trade wars. And all of these policies disproportionately hurt farm country. 
The Trump tax cut largely passes farmers by, because they aren’t corporations and few of them are rich.

GET ME REWRITE: Scott Walker still doesn't have a real job




Scott Walker spins gerrymandering on.  (Madison.com, 5/11/2019)


Original 3/24/2019 post, "Scott Walker on board with the National Republican Redistricting Trust to preserve North Carolina's gerrymandered districts", starts here.


GOP redistricting edge moderated Democrats’ 2018 gains, Associated Press analysis finds.  (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 3/22/2019)
Smoking gun:  invoices for X-ACTO knives.  The AP used the so-called “efficiency gap” test in part because it was one of the analytical tools cited in a Wisconsin gerrymandering case that went before the U.S. Supreme Court in 2017 and is part of a North Carolina case scheduled to be argued on Tuesday before the court. In that case, justices will decide whether to uphold a lower court ruling that struck down North Carolina’s congressional districts as an unconstitutional political gerrymander favoring Republicans. 

The GOP, of course, prefers the OLD, severely gerrymandered map.
Source:  WRAL, 7/13/2018
Related post:
GET ME REWRITE: Scott Walker joins group that fought to preserve gerrymandered congressional districts in Pennsylvania.  (3/22/2019)
Broken record: The WIGOP gerrymander messaging of power-mad Assembly Speaker Robin Vos.  (12/2/2018)
In a close vote, male-dominated Columbia County Board of Supervisors endorses gerrymandering of state and congressional legislative districts.  (1/22/2018)
Wisconsin redistricting: Judges saw evidence, reached obvious conclusion, part 1.  (1/28/2017)
Wisconsin redistricting: Judges saw evidence, reached obvious conclusion, part 2.  (1/28/2017)
Wisconsin redistricting: Judges saw evidence, reached obvious conclusion, part 3.  (1/28/2017)
Transparency is not a word in Robin Vos's vocabulary.  (1/1/2019)

Friday, May 10, 2019

Population loss in rural Kansas: Rawlins County


Source:  Wikipedia (Rawlins County, Atwood)


Atwood is the county seat of Rawlins County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 26.7% - Rawlins County
  • 32.3% - Kansas
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 27.8% - Rawlins County
  • 15.4% - Kansas
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Rawlins County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1936. (Barry Goldwaster won by a margin of 14.7 percentage points over LBJ.  George Wallace received 8.8% of the vote in 1968.)


Other Kansas population loss posts:
Cheyenne County/St. Francis.  (5/10/2019)

Population loss in rural Kansas: Cheyenne County


Source:  Wikipedia (Cheyenne County, St. Francis)


St. Francis is the county seat of Cheyenne County.

Population loss by degrees:  80-89%70-79%, 60-69%, 50-59%.


Percentage of population 25 and older with a bachelor's degree:
  • 25.8% - Cheyenne County
  • 32.3% - Kansas
  • 30.9% - U.S.
Percentage of population 65 and older:
  • 26.2% - Cheyenne County
  • 15.4% - Kansas
  • 15.6% - U.S.

The last time Cheyenne County voted for a Democratic candidate for president was in 1936. (Barry Goldwaster won by a margin of 12.8 percentage points over LBJ.  George Wallace received 8.9% of the vote in 1968.)

Oak Ridge Apartments UPDATE: May site visit


Now occupied.

Photo by Retiring Guy


3/19/2019 update starts here.

70 of the 83 units set aside with incomes 30% to 60% of Dane County's median.

Photos by Retiring Guy

With the neighboring Meadow Ridge in view.  (Most of the units are available to tenants with incomes 30% to 60% of Dane County median.

Foyer

2 views of first-floor community room


Living space of 3-bedroom grandfamily apartment



12/31/2018 update starts here.

Photo by Retiring Guy


10/17/2018 update, "Topped off, soon to be twin of Meadow Ridge apartment building", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy


6/28/2018 update starts here.

Photos by Retiring Giuy


Total Units: 83 
Affordable Units: 70

Two story entrance atrium and fireplace, resident community room, exercise room, beauty salon, business center and on-site storage. 

Three bedroom units targeted to "grandfamilies".

More info found here.


6/7/2018 update, "3rd floor framing underway", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy


5/2/2018 update, "2nd floor framing underway" starts here.

Photo by Retiring Guy

4/22/2018 update, "Panorama view of construction progress", starts here.

Photo by Retiring Guy

3/23/2018 update, "Oak Ridge Apartments first floor framing underway", starts here.

Photo by Retiring Guy

The Oak Ridge Apartments is a development within the Parmenter Area Concept Plan.  (Not carved in stone.)



2/27/2018 update, "Foundation work begins", starts here.

Photo by Retiring Guy

First floor plan


1/30/208 update, " Oak Ridge Apartments excavation underway", starts here.

That's the recently completed Meadow Ridge Apartments at right.

Photo by Retiring Guy


Video by Retiring Guy




12/11/2017 update, "Oak Ridge Apartments expands options for low-income housing in Middleton", starts here.

Oak Ridge will take over the site of a former softball diamond.

Photos by Retiring Guy

New Middleton housing complex to include 'grandfamily' units.  (Capital Times, 12/3/2017)
The Oak Ridge development project is an 83-unit mixed income independent senior living center and is being developed by the JT Klein Company. Of the total units, 70 will be set aside for tenants with incomes between 30 and 60 percent of the county median, which is between $25,550 and $51,120 for a family of four.



Dane County contributed $665,000 to the approximately $14 million project through its affordable housing fund, following the Board of Supervisors’ approval Thursday. The project also received $882,958 in low-income housing tax credits from the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority.

It's a quibble, but these do appear to be maple trees.




Original 5/16/2017 post, "The Oak Ridge Apartments will soon join Meadow Ridge", starts here.

The Oak Ridge Apartments, not to be confused with the Oakridge Apartments on Cypress Way in Madison, will be constructed on a former softball field on Lisa Lane, which is perpendicular to Laura Lane and parallel to Donna Drive.

Photo by Retiring Guy

Orange arrow marks approximate location where above photo was taken.

Source;  City of Middleton (orange arrow added)

Related post:
Meadow Ridge series.

Navitus Health Solutions building project UPDATE: May drive-around




4/15/2019 update starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy



3/4/2019 update starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy



11/17/2018 update starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy



9/24/2018 update starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy




9/7/2018 update starts here.

View from in front of UW Health West Towne Climinc
Photos by Retiring Guy

View from the east edge of the Noodles and Company parking lot


View of the building set back from Mineral Point Road



8/8/2018 update, "August progress report', starts here.

View from Noodles and Company parking lot on Mineral Point Road

View from James Madison Memorial High School across Gammon Road


View from across right field corner of James Madison Memorial High School baseball field

7/13/2018 update, "Midsummer progress report", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy

Navitus builds new headquarters, keeps distance from big drug benefit managers.  (Wisconsin State Journal, 7/6/2018)





6/13/2018 update, "Another building takes shape on Navitus campus" starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy



4/30/2018 update, "5 floors of a steel skeleton", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy


 Remains of the razed building


4/19/2018 update, "A close up and a distant view", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy


4/12/2018 update, "New headquarters skeleton and a big pile of rubble", starts here.



Video and photos by Retiring Guy

4/4/2018 update, "The going-up new and the coming-down old", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy



3/29/2018 update, "Steel beams start to give shape to construction", starts here.

Photo by Retiring Guy


3/26/2018 update, "Demolition continues, tower doubles in height", starts here.



Photos by Retiring Guy



3/21/2018 update, "Demolition of award-winning 1970 building", starts here.



3/12/2018 update, "The latest developments in construction and excavation", starts here.

Coming soon to this tower's location:  a 5-story, 80,000-square-foot building to be occupied by Lumicera, Navitus' specialty pharmacy division.

Photos by Retiring Guy


Not sure what purpose the earthen ramp serves.

Still not sure.

Wasn't that fun?


2/22/2018 update, "Excavation work underway, but no demolition yet", starts here.


Subdivision application


Maps and Plans

Snow melt creates a pond not included in the plans.

Photos by Retiring Guy

2/6/2018 update, "Snow or no snow, let the demolition begin!", starts here.


Photos by Retiring Guy



1/13/2018 update, "Property is fenced but demolition has yet to start", starts here.

Photos by Retiring Guy

Though not completely, at least during a visit last month.


It's an award-winning building that is meeting the wrecking ball.

Source:  Madison Public Library pamphlet files


11/5/2017 update, "First round of construction approved by Madison Plan Commission", starts here.

Renderings:  City of Madison (street identification added above)

Madison committee approves development for Navitus Health Solutions headquarters.  (Madison.com, 10/3/2017)
Project to be finished in March 2019.  The Madison Plan Commission on Monday signed off on several components of the Livesey Co.’s “West Place” project at the corner of South Gammon and Mineral Point roads. A five-story, 80,000-square-foot office building intended for the pharmacy benefits management company, a two-story, 30,000-square-foot specialty pharmacy building and two retail buildings are proposed as the first round of construction.


3/27/217 update, " It's a gray day for developer of far west-side Madison project", starts here.


Developer puts big project near West Towne Mall on hold.  (Wisconsin State Journal, 3/21/2017)
As configured, the finances of the project simply do not add up, said Melissa Huggins, a principal at Urban Assets of Madison who is a consultant for Livesey on the redevelopment. 
Livesey, which owns the property, now will take months to “retool” the project and determine what makes economic sense, Huggins said. “ 
It’s a blow,” she said. “There’s been a lot of thought and a lot of investment. It’s disappointing, that’s for sure.”  


3/7/2017 update, Sign of a major change at Gammom and Mineral Point roads, starts here.

Not a done deal yet.




Photos by Retiring Guy


Mixed-use project at Mineral Point and Gammon referred to allay neighborhood concerns.  (Capital Times, 1/26/2017)
The project would be built in five phases over the next five to 15 years, potentially adding up to 17 buildings. The application states that future uses could include a grocery store, senior housing and a hotel. Plans include a new private road, Monona Drive, that winds through the center of the development, which the application refers to as “the spine that ties the project together.”


Original 10/23/2016 post, "Makeover at Gammon and Mineral Point roads", starts here.

Constructed in the early 1970s, the building originally served as the headquarters of Famous Footwear.  Most recently, it was occupied by Madison Area Technical College.

Photo by Retiring Guy

Project aims to remake large, open property at Gammon, Mineral Point roads.  (Madison.com, 10/22/2016)
The estimated $50 million first phase of the development called West Place would involve construction of five buildings clustered on the corner of Gammon and Mineral Point roads. They would total 106 apartments, nearly 50,500 square feet of retail space and about 23,000 square feet for office space.