Saturday, August 27, 2016

Pauline Smith VanVolkinburg (1925-2016) Warren High School Class of 1943



1943 Dragon yearbook

Pauline's high-school activities:
Carnival (3); Dramatic Club (2, 3, 4); Girls' Club (2, 3, 4); Latin Club (2, 3, 4).

1967 Warren City Directory

  • [county section] VanVolkinburg Paula 17 Woodcrest dr
1983 Warren City Directory
  • VanVolkinburg E & Pauline A; retd h17 Woodcrest Dr

Sidebar:  I know for a fact that Mr. Vanvolkinburg was living at 17 Woodcrest Dr since his son Mark was one of my best friends in high school.

'Pauline' was a relatively popular name during the 1st third of the 20th century, peaking at #32 in 1915, the year after the weekly movie serial, The Perils of Pauline (20 episodes), was produced.


Other members of the class of '43:
Joyce Anderson Clark.  (8/24/2016)
Robert Johnson.  (3/31/2016)
Goldie Gelotte Hecei. (12/21/2015)
John Swick.  (11/29/2015)
William Weidert.  (10/16/2015)
Maxine Retterer Young.  (8/15/2015)
Donald Conaway, Jr.  (8/13/2015)
Anne Smith Rossey.  (5/8/2015)
Doris Stevenson Barirde.  (3/31/2015)
Mildred Kahle Glotz.  (9/13/2014)
Robert Dietsch.  (9/8/2014)
Anna Mae Olson Howe.  (9/2/2014)
Lois Bogart Niederer.  (5/3/2014)
Verna Mack Swanson.  (12/22/2013)

Cocks not glocks on the University of Texas-Austin campus




UT students use sex toys to protest campus carry law.  (Austin Statesman, 8/24/2016)
The protest, dubbed “Cocks Not Glocks,” coincided with the first day of classes. Participants strapped the sex toys to their backpacks or handed them out on campus, holding a midday rally to protest the campus carry law that allows concealed-handgun permit holders to take their weapons to most parts of campus. 
Event organizers said they hope students will continue to carry the dildos until the law is repealed.

As you would expect, the National Review is not amused.  

Tellingly, staff writer David French has to s---t---r---e---t---c---h all the way back to January 16, 2002, to find an example to support his argument.


Adapt 2030 gets caught with its climate denier pants down


Adapt 2030 fantasy.  (Posted on 10/6/2015)



2016 reality.



As this Wall Street Journal video reports:
Last summer, about 20 ships passed through the strait, compared with 13 ships in 2013 and only four in 2006.  

In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage.  (Wisconsin Public Radio, 8/27/2016)
It has 13 decks, eight restaurants, a casino and a spa. Staterooms start at about $20,000 and run as high as $120,000. And it's about to journey through the Northwest Passage. The Crystal Serenity is the largest cruise ship to navigate from Alaska to New York City, by way of the Arctic Ocean. And as climate change opens up the top of the world, it may be just the first taste of what's to come.

Related reading:
As a luxury cruise ship comes to town, Nome confronts its future.  (Alaska Daily News, 8/23/2016)
Warming temperatures in the Arctic brought about by climate change have transformed the region's once impenetrable ice pack into seasonal open waters that — while still dangerous — are increasingly seen as navigable. Beneville, his blue eyes wide and expressive, speaks with proselytistic fervor of the growth of Arctic shipping and its economic possibilities for Nome, the region and the state. 
This visit, as Mayor Richard Beneville put it, is "a game-changer."

First stop Ulukhaktok: Crystal Serenity cruise ship sails into N.W.T.  (CBC News, 8/27/2016)
The weekend the community of Ulukhaktok, N.W.T., has been waiting for has arrived. The Crystal Serenity cruise ship sailed into the hamlet of 400 people on Friday afternoon, bringing with it about 1,000 passengers and 600 crew. It's the largest cruise ship ever to sail through the Northwest Passage, having left Anchorage, Alaska, on Aug. 16 on its way to New York.


Ulukhaktok was known as Holmen until 4/1/2006.

Crystal Cruises on Facebook

Book passage on the 2017 cruise here.

UPDATE. Watertown Public Library: Annual Circulation and Program Attendance, 2009-2015




Source:  Wisconsin Public Library Service Data (2015 preliminary)

Other updates:
Madison Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Brown County Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Appleton Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Waukesha Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Hedberg Public Library, Janesville.  (8/12/2016)
Kenosha Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
La Crosse Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Marathon County Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Neenah Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Racine Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
L. E. Phillips Memorial Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Fond du Lac Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Middleton Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
West Allis Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
Brookfield Public Library.  (8/17/2016)
Mead Public Library, Sheboygan.  (8/17/2016)
Sun Prairie Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Verona Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Manitowoc Public Library.  (8/19/2016)
McMillan Memorial Public Library, Wisconsin Rapids. (8/20/2016)
La Crosse County Library. (8/20/2016)
Franklin Public Library.  (8/21/2016)
Elisha D. Smith Public Library, Menasha.  (8/21/2016)
Beloit Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Portage County Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Marshfield Public Library.  (8/23/2016)
Beaver Dam Community Library.  (8/23/2016)
Fitchburg Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
Shorewood Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
New Berlin Public Library.  (8/25/2016)
Door County Library.  (8/25/2016)
Whitefish Bay Public Library.  (8/26/2016)
Menomonee Falls Public Library.  (8/26/2016)
Cudahy Family Library.  (8/27/2016)


Original 9/12/2015 post starts here.




Statistics found at Wisconsin Public Library Service Data: 1996 - Preliminary 2014. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction)

How libraries rank




Watertown Public Library website.




Related reading:

Library Services in the Digital Age.  (Pew Internet, 1/22/2013)
  • Part 1:  The role of libraries in people's lives and communities
    • Family members' library use from childhood
      • Did anyone else in your family use public libraries when you were growing up?  (table)
    • Americans' library use
      • Have you ever visited a library or bookmobile in person?  (table)
      • Visited a library in-person in the last year?  (table)
      • A snapshot of Americans' library use habits (table)
    • Experiences at public libraries are positive
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities
    • How important are libraries to you and your family?
      • How important are libraries?  (bar graph)
    • Libraries' importance to the community as a whole
      • How important are libraries? (table)
  • Part 2:  What people do at libraries and library websites
    • Activities at libraries
      • (bar graph)
      • Browse the shelves for books or media
      • Borrow print books
      • Research topics that interest them
      • Get help from a librarian
      • Sit, read and study, or watch or listen to media
      • Use a research database
      • Attend or bring a younger person to a class, program, or event designed for children or teens
      • Borrow a DVD or videotape of a movie or TV show
      • Read or check out printed magazines or newspapers
      • Attend a meeting of a group
      • Attend a class, program or lecture for adults
      • Borrow or download an audiobook
      • Borrow a music CD
    • How frequently people receive assistance from library staff
      • (bar graph)
        • by race/ethnicity
        • by household income
    • Use of library websites
      • (table)
    • Changes in library use in recent years
      • The main reasons patrons' library use has changed in recent years (table)
    • Technology users and library use
      • Tech users more likely than non-tech users to say they use the library less than they used to (bar graph)
  • Part 3:  Technology use at libraries
    • Those who have used free internet and computers in their communities (table)
    • Use of computers and the internet at libraries
      • Internet use at libraries (table)
    • How important is free internet use at libraries?
      • (table)

Reading & Library Habits in Different Communities.  (Pew Research Center, 12/20/2012)
  • Urban/Suburban/Rural
    • Book readers
    • Device owners
    • Among e-book readers
    • Purposes for reading
    • Library activities
    • Where people get book recommendations


Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.  (Pew Internet, 10/23/2012)
  •  General reading habits
    • Book readers by age (graph)
    • Book formats read in the past year, by age group (graph)
    • E-books beyond e-readers (graph)
    • How e-content has affected younger Americans' reading habits
  • When to borrow, when to buy
    • Thinking about the last book you read, in any format, did you... (graph)
  • Library use
    • Library use in the past year (table)
    • How important is the public library to you and your family?  (graph)
  • How library patrons' habits have changed since they began borrowing e-books
  • Library patrons' experiences with e-book borrowing
    • How they find out about e-books
    • The checkout process
  • Non e-book borrowers

Libraries, patrons, and e-books.  (Pew Internet, 6/22/2012)

Other circ/program attendance posts:
Madison Public Library.  (7/23/2015)
Milwaukee Public Library.  (7/25/2015)
Brown County Public Library. (7/26/2015)
Appleton Public Library.  (7/27/2015)
Waukesha Public Library.  (7/29/2015)
Hedberg Public Library, Janesville.  (7/31/2015)
Kenosha Public Library.  (8/2/2015)
La Crosse Public Library. (8/15/2015)
Marathon County Public Library.  (8/17/2015)
Neenah Public Library.  (8/18/2015)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (8/19/2015)
Racine Public Library.  (8/20/2015)
L. E. Phillips Memorial Public Library, Eau Claire.  (8/21/2015)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (8/22/2015)
Fond du Lac Public Library.  (8/23/2015)
Middleton Public Library.  (8/24/2015)
West Allis Public Library.  (8/25/2015)
Brookfield Public Library.  (8/26/2015)
Mead Public Library, Sheboygan.  (8/27/2015)
Sun Prairie Public Library.  (8/28/2015)
Verona Public Library.  (8/29/2015)
Manitowoc Public Library.  (8/30/2015)
West Bend Community Public Library.  (8/31/2015)
McMillan Memorial Library.  (9/1/2015)
La Crosse County Library.  (9/2/2015)
Franklin Public Library.  (9/3/2015)
Elisha D. Smith Public Library, Menasha.  (9/4/2015)
Beloit Public Library.  (9/6/2015)
Beaver Dam Community Library.  (9/7/2015)
Marshfield Public Library.  (9/8/2015)
Portage County Public Library.  (9/9/2015)
Shorewood Public Library.  (9/10/2015)

UPDATE. Cudahy Family Library: Annual Circulation and Program Attendance, 2009-2015




Source:  Wisconsin Public Library Service Data (2015 preliminary)

Other updates:
Madison Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Brown County Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Appleton Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Waukesha Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Hedberg Public Library, Janesville.  (8/12/2016)
Kenosha Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
La Crosse Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Marathon County Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Neenah Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Racine Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
L. E. Phillips Memorial Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Fond du Lac Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Middleton Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
West Allis Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
Brookfield Public Library.  (8/17/2016)
Mead Public Library, Sheboygan.  (8/17/2016)
Sun Prairie Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Verona Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Manitowoc Public Library.  (8/19/2016)
McMillan Memorial Public Library, Wisconsin Rapids. (8/20/2016)
La Crosse County Library. (8/20/2016)
Franklin Public Library.  (8/21/2016)
Elisha D. Smith Public Library, Menasha.  (8/21/2016)
Beloit Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Portage County Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Marshfield Public Library.  (8/23/2016)
Beaver Dam Community Library.  (8/23/2016)
Fitchburg Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
Shorewood Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
New Berlin Public Library.  (8/25/2016)
Door County Library.  (8/25/2016)
Whitefish Bay Public Library.  (8/26/2016)
Menomonee Falls Public Library.  (8/26/2016)


Original 9/16/2015 post starts here.





Statistics found at Wisconsin Public Library Service Data: 1996 - Preliminary 2014. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction)

How libraries rank



Cudahy Family Library, a member of the Milwaukee County Federated Library System.


Related reading:

Parents, Children, and Libraries.  (Pew Internet, 5/1/2013)
  • Part 1:  A profile of parents
    • Demographic profile of a sample of parents vs. national parameters (table)
    • Demographic profile of parents and other adults (table)
  • Part 2:  Parents and reading
    • Reading frequency for parents and other adults (table)
    • Types of books read in past 12 months differs for parents and other adults (column graph)


Library Services in the Digital Age.  (Pew Internet, 1/22/2013)
  • Part 1:  The role of libraries in people's lives and communities
    • Family members' library use from childhood
      • Did anyone else in your family use public libraries when you were growing up?  (table)
    • Americans' library use
      • Have you ever visited a library or bookmobile in person?  (table)
      • Visited a library in-person in the last year?  (table)
      • A snapshot of Americans' library use habits (table)
    • Experiences at public libraries are positive
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities
    • How important are libraries to you and your family?
      • How important are libraries?  (bar graph)
    • Libraries' importance to the community as a whole
      • How important are libraries? (table)
  • Part 2:  What people do at libraries and library websites
    • Activities at libraries
      • (bar graph)
      • Browse the shelves for books or media
      • Borrow print books
      • Research topics that interest them
      • Get help from a librarian
      • Sit, read and study, or watch or listen to media
      • Use a research database
      • Attend or bring a younger person to a class, program, or event designed for children or teens
      • Borrow a DVD or videotape of a movie or TV show
      • Read or check out printed magazines or newspapers
      • Attend a meeting of a group
      • Attend a class, program or lecture for adults
      • Borrow or download an audiobook
      • Borrow a music CD
    • How frequently people receive assistance from library staff
      • (bar graph)
        • by race/ethnicity
        • by household income
    • Use of library websites
      • (table)
    • Changes in library use in recent years
      • The main reasons patrons' library use has changed in recent years (table)
    • Technology users and library use
      • Tech users more likely than non-tech users to say they use the library less than they used to (bar graph)
  • Part 3:  Technology use at libraries
    • Those who have used free internet and computers in their communities (table)
    • Use of computers and the internet at libraries
      • Internet use at libraries (table)
    • How important is free internet use at libraries?
      • (table)
  • Part 4:  What people want from their libraries
    • How much people know about what their libraries offer
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
    • What is important for libraries to offer?
      • What people think is important for libraries to offers? (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
      • Women are more likely than men to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
    • Examples
      • Librarians to help people find information they need
      • Borrowing books
      • Free access to computers and the Internet
      • Quiet study spaces for adults and children
      • Programs and classes for children and teens
      • Research resources such as free databases
      • Job, employment, and career resources
      • Free events and activities, such as classes and cultural events, for all ages
      • Free public meeting spaces
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and programs ;libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Coordinate more closely with schools in providing resources to kids
      • Offer free early literacy programs to help young children prepare for school
      • Have completely separate locations or spaces for different services
      • Have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing at the library
      • Offer a broader selection of e-books
      • Offer more interactive learning experiences similar to museum exhibits
      • Help users digitize materials such as family photos or historical documents
      • Have most library service online so users can access them without having to visit the library
      • Make most services automated
      • Move some print books and stacks out of the library to free up more space
    • The new services people say they would (and would not) use
      • How likely American say they would be to use various library services (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to say they would use the following services (bar graph)
      • Examples
        • An online research service where you could post questions and get responses from librarians
        • A program that allowed people to try out the newest tech devices or applications
        • Personalized online accounts that give you customized recommendations for books and services based on your past library activity
        • A cell phone app that allows you to access and use library services from your phone and see what programs the library offers
        • Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself
        • A cell phone app that helps you locate material within the library by guiding you with GPS
        • E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read
        • A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like movies or your own e-books
        • Classes on how to download e-books to handheld devices
        • Classes or instruction on how to use handheld reading devices like e-book readers and tablet computers 
  • Part 5:  The present and the future of libraries
    • Libraries' strengths
    • What should be libraries' 'guiding principle'?
    • Things to change
    • Library innovations
    • Roadblocks and concerns


Reading & Library Habits in Different Communities.  (Pew Research Center, 12/20/2012)
  • Urban/Suburban/Rural
    • Book readers
    • Device owners
    • Among e-book readers
    • Purposes for reading
    • Library activities
    • Where people get book recommendations


Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.  (Pew Internet, 10/23/2012)
  •  General reading habits
    • Book readers by age (graph)
    • Book formats read in the past year, by age group (graph)
    • E-books beyond e-readers (graph)
    • How e-content has affected younger Americans' reading habits
  • When to borrow, when to buy
    • Thinking about the last book you read, in any format, did you... (graph)
  • Library use
    • Library use in the past year (table)
    • How important is the public library to you and your family?  (graph)
  • How library patrons' habits have changed since they began borrowing e-books
  • Library patrons' experiences with e-book borrowing
    • How they find out about e-books
    • The checkout process
  • Non e-book borrowers

Libraries, patrons, and e-books.  (Pew Internet, 6/22/2012)


Friday, August 26, 2016

Mark Bevevino (1933-2016) Warren High School Class of 1951



1951 Dragon yearbook

1967 Warren City Directory
  • Bevevino Joseph A (Jane L; Bevevino Electric) h812 Carbon pl
  • Bevevino Mark R (Charlotte G) h312 Laurel
1983 Warren City Directory
  • Bevevino Mrs Jane L retd h55 Highland Dr Apt C3
  • [county section] Bevevino Charlotte r4 E Woodcrest Dr Clarendon
  • [county section] Bevevino Mark r4 E Woodcrest Dr Clarendon
  • [county sectionn] Bevevino Randal r4 E Woodcrest Dr Clarendon
  • [county section] Bevevino Rebecca r4 E Woodcrest Dr. Clarendon 
  • Bevevino Ross A cnc opr G & R Mach

Mark's best years occurred during the 1950s and 60s when he spent 16 years (1955-1970) in the top 10 -- six of them at #6 (1959-64).


Other members of the WHS class of 1951:
Diedra Peterson Andersen.  (6/8/2016)
Marilyn Lyke Bonace.  (6/6/2016)
John Tingwell.  (6/5/2016)
Donald Quiggle.  (12/19/2015)
Genevieve Larson McKown.  (12/16/2015)
Franklin Reiff.  (7/14/2015)
Mary Ann Font Schafer.  (6/29/2015)

UPDATE. Menomonee Falls Public Library: Annual Circulation and Program Attendance, 2009-2015





Recent MFPL news:
Schall experiences many changes in 40 years with Menomonee Falls library.  (Northwest Now, 6/7/2016)
But, Menomonee Falls Public Library director Jane Schall, who retired June 3, after nearly 49 years at the library, explained that the department she worked in for much of that time, technical services, also experienced the most change. 
'I worked with cataloging, so we went from typing up catalog cards on a typewriter to using a magnetic tape typewriter to putting everything in a marked record that computers use,' Schall said. 'I've always been learning something new. There's always been change in my job; it's never been stagnant.'

New Menomonee Falls library director eager to get started.  (Northwest Now, 6/24/2016)
Like Schall, Kennedy started her library work as a part-time shelver, got a masters degree in library science from UW-Milwaukee, and then moved up the ranks over the last few decades. Kennedy, who has been the deputy director at the Waukesha Public Library for the last seven years, applied for the director position in Menomonee Falls because she was looking for a leadership opportunity.

Other updates:
Madison Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Brown County Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Appleton Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Waukesha Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Hedberg Public Library, Janesville.  (8/12/2016)
Kenosha Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
La Crosse Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Marathon County Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Neenah Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Racine Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
L. E. Phillips Memorial Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Fond du Lac Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Middleton Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
West Allis Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
Brookfield Public Library.  (8/17/2016)
Mead Public Library, Sheboygan.  (8/17/2016)
Sun Prairie Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Verona Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Manitowoc Public Library.  (8/19/2016)
McMillan Memorial Public Library, Wisconsin Rapids. (8/20/2016)
La Crosse County Library. (8/20/2016)
Franklin Public Library.  (8/21/2016)
Elisha D. Smith Public Library, Menasha.  (8/21/2016)
Beloit Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Portage County Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Marshfield Public Library.  (8/23/2016)
Beaver Dam Community Library.  (8/23/2016)
Fitchburg Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
Shorewood Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
New Berlin Public Library.  (8/25/2016)
Door County Library.  (8/25/2016)
Whitefish Bay Public Library.  (8/26/2016)


Original 9/14/2015 post starts here.




Statistics found at Wisconsin Public Library Service Data: 1996 - Preliminary 2014. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction)

How libraries rank



Menomonee Falls Public Library, a member of the Waukesha County Federated Library System.


Related reading:

Library Services in the Digital Age.  (Pew Internet, 1/22/2013)

  • Part 1:  The role of libraries in people's lives and communities
    • Family members' library use from childhood
      • Did anyone else in your family use public libraries when you were growing up?  (table)
    • Americans' library use
      • Have you ever visited a library or bookmobile in person?  (table)
      • Visited a library in-person in the last year?  (table)
      • A snapshot of Americans' library use habits (table)
    • Experiences at public libraries are positive
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities
    • How important are libraries to you and your family?
      • How important are libraries?  (bar graph)
    • Libraries' importance to the community as a whole
      • How important are libraries? (table)
  • Part 2:  What people do at libraries and library websites
    • Activities at libraries
      • (bar graph)
      • Browse the shelves for books or media
      • Borrow print books
      • Research topics that interest them
      • Get help from a librarian
      • Sit, read and study, or watch or listen to media
      • Use a research database
      • Attend or bring a younger person to a class, program, or event designed for children or teens
      • Borrow a DVD or videotape of a movie or TV show
      • Read or check out printed magazines or newspapers
      • Attend a meeting of a group
      • Attend a class, program or lecture for adults
      • Borrow or download an audiobook
      • Borrow a music CD
    • How frequently people receive assistance from library staff
      • (bar graph)
        • by race/ethnicity
        • by household income
    • Use of library websites
      • (table)
    • Changes in library use in recent years
      • The main reasons patrons' library use has changed in recent years (table)
    • Technology users and library use
      • Tech users more likely than non-tech users to say they use the library less than they used to (bar graph)
  • Part 3:  Technology use at libraries
    • Those who have used free internet and computers in their communities (table)
    • Use of computers and the internet at libraries
      • Internet use at libraries (table)
    • How important is free internet use at libraries?
      • (table)
  • Part 4:  What people want from their libraries
    • How much people know about what their libraries offer
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
    • What is important for libraries to offer?
      • What people think is important for libraries to offers? (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
      • Women are more likely than men to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
    • Examples
      • Librarians to help people find information they need
      • Borrowing books
      • Free access to computers and the Internet
      • Quiet study spaces for adults and children
      • Programs and classes for children and teens
      • Research resources such as free databases
      • Job, employment, and career resources
      • Free events and activities, such as classes and cultural events, for all ages
      • Free public meeting spaces
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and programs ;libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Coordinate more closely with schools in providing resources to kids
      • Offer free early literacy programs to help young children prepare for school
      • Have completely separate locations or spaces for different services
      • Have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing at the library
      • Offer a broader selection of e-books
      • Offer more interactive learning experiences similar to museum exhibits
      • Help users digitize materials such as family photos or historical documents
      • Have most library service online so users can access them without having to visit the library
      • Make most services automated
      • Move some print books and stacks out of the library to free up more space
    • The new services people say they would (and would not) use
      • How likely American say they would be to use various library services (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to say they would use the following services (bar graph)
      • Examples
        • An online research service where you could post questions and get responses from librarians
        • A program that allowed people to try out the newest tech devices or applications
        • Personalized online accounts that give you customized recommendations for books and services based on your past library activity
        • A cell phone app that allows you to access and use library services from your phone and see what programs the library offers
        • Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself
        • A cell phone app that helps you locate material within the library by guiding you with GPS
        • E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read
        • A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like movies or your own e-books
        • Classes on how to download e-books to handheld devices
        • Classes or instruction on how to use handheld reading devices like e-book readers and tablet computers 
  • Part 5:  The present and the future of libraries
    • Libraries' strengths
    • What should be libraries' 'guiding principle'?
    • Things to change
    • Library innovations
    • Roadblocks and concerns


Reading & Library Habits in Different Communities.  (Pew Research Center, 12/20/2012)
  • Urban/Suburban/Rural
    • Book readers
    • Device owners
    • Among e-book readers
    • Purposes for reading
    • Library activities
    • Where people get book recommendations


Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.  (Pew Internet, 10/23/2012)
  •  General reading habits
    • Book readers by age (graph)
    • Book formats read in the past year, by age group (graph)
    • E-books beyond e-readers (graph)
    • How e-content has affected younger Americans' reading habits
  • When to borrow, when to buy
    • Thinking about the last book you read, in any format, did you... (graph)
  • Library use
    • Library use in the past year (table)
    • How important is the public library to you and your family?  (graph)
  • How library patrons' habits have changed since they began borrowing e-books
  • Library patrons' experiences with e-book borrowing
    • How they find out about e-books
    • The checkout process
  • Non e-book borrowers

Libraries, patrons, and e-books.  (Pew Internet, 6/22/2012)


UPDATE. Whitefish Bay Public Library: Annual Circulation and Program Attendance, 2009-2015




Source:  Wisconsin Public Library Service Data (2015 preliminary)

Other updates:
Madison Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Brown County Public Library.  (8/11/2016)
Appleton Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Waukesha Public Library.  (8/12/2016)
Hedberg Public Library, Janesville.  (8/12/2016)
Kenosha Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
La Crosse Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Marathon County Public Library.  (8/13/2016)
Neenah Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Oshkosh Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
Racine Public Library.  (8/14/2016)
L. E. Phillips Memorial Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Wauwatosa Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Fond du Lac Public Library.  (8/15/2016)
Middleton Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
West Allis Public Library.  (8/16/2016)
Brookfield Public Library.  (8/17/2016)
Mead Public Library, Sheboygan.  (8/17/2016)
Sun Prairie Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Verona Public Library.  (8/18/2016)
Manitowoc Public Library.  (8/19/2016)
McMillan Memorial Public Library, Wisconsin Rapids. (8/20/2016)
La Crosse County Library. (8/20/2016)
Franklin Public Library.  (8/21/2016)
Elisha D. Smith Public Library, Menasha.  (8/21/2016)
Beloit Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Portage County Public Library.  (8/22/2016)
Marshfield Public Library.  (8/23/2016)
Beaver Dam Community Library.  (8/23/2016)
Fitchburg Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
Shorewood Public Library.  (8/24/2016)
New Berlin Public Library.  (8/25/2016)
Door County Library.  (8/25/2016)


Original 9/15/2015 post starts here.
Add caption



Statistics found at Wisconsin Public Library Service Data: 1996 - Preliminary 2014. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction)

How libraries rank


Whitefish Bay Public Library, a member of the Milwaukee County Federated Library System.


Related reading:

Parents, Children, and Libraries.  (Pew Internet, 5/1/2013)

  • Part 1:  A profile of parents
    • Demographic profile of a sample of parents vs. national parameters (table)
    • Demographic profile of parents and other adults (table)


Library Services in the Digital Age.  (Pew Internet, 1/22/2013)
  • Part 1:  The role of libraries in people's lives and communities
    • Family members' library use from childhood
      • Did anyone else in your family use public libraries when you were growing up?  (table)
    • Americans' library use
      • Have you ever visited a library or bookmobile in person?  (table)
      • Visited a library in-person in the last year?  (table)
      • A snapshot of Americans' library use habits (table)
    • Experiences at public libraries are positive
    • How important libraries are to individuals and their communities
    • How important are libraries to you and your family?
      • How important are libraries?  (bar graph)
    • Libraries' importance to the community as a whole
      • How important are libraries? (table)
  • Part 2:  What people do at libraries and library websites
    • Activities at libraries
      • (bar graph)
      • Browse the shelves for books or media
      • Borrow print books
      • Research topics that interest them
      • Get help from a librarian
      • Sit, read and study, or watch or listen to media
      • Use a research database
      • Attend or bring a younger person to a class, program, or event designed for children or teens
      • Borrow a DVD or videotape of a movie or TV show
      • Read or check out printed magazines or newspapers
      • Attend a meeting of a group
      • Attend a class, program or lecture for adults
      • Borrow or download an audiobook
      • Borrow a music CD
    • How frequently people receive assistance from library staff
      • (bar graph)
        • by race/ethnicity
        • by household income
    • Use of library websites
      • (table)
    • Changes in library use in recent years
      • The main reasons patrons' library use has changed in recent years (table)
    • Technology users and library use
      • Tech users more likely than non-tech users to say they use the library less than they used to (bar graph)
  • Part 3:  Technology use at libraries
    • Those who have used free internet and computers in their communities (table)
    • Use of computers and the internet at libraries
      • Internet use at libraries (table)
    • How important is free internet use at libraries?
      • (table)
  • Part 4:  What people want from their libraries
    • How much people know about what their libraries offer
      • How much do you feel like you know about the different services and programs your public library offers?  (bar graph)
    • What is important for libraries to offer?
      • What people think is important for libraries to offers? (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
      • Women are more likely than men to see various library services as 'very important' (bar graph)
    • Examples
      • Librarians to help people find information they need
      • Borrowing books
      • Free access to computers and the Internet
      • Quiet study spaces for adults and children
      • Programs and classes for children and teens
      • Research resources such as free databases
      • Job, employment, and career resources
      • Free events and activities, such as classes and cultural events, for all ages
      • Free public meeting spaces
    • Public priorities for libraries
      • What services and programs ;libraries should (and should not) implement (bar graph)
      • Coordinate more closely with schools in providing resources to kids
      • Offer free early literacy programs to help young children prepare for school
      • Have completely separate locations or spaces for different services
      • Have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing at the library
      • Offer a broader selection of e-books
      • Offer more interactive learning experiences similar to museum exhibits
      • Help users digitize materials such as family photos or historical documents
      • Have most library service online so users can access them without having to visit the library
      • Make most services automated
      • Move some print books and stacks out of the library to free up more space
    • The new services people say they would (and would not) use
      • How likely American say they would be to use various library services (bar graph)
      • Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to say they would use the following services (bar graph)
      • Examples
        • An online research service where you could post questions and get responses from librarians
        • A program that allowed people to try out the newest tech devices or applications
        • Personalized online accounts that give you customized recommendations for books and services based on your past library activity
        • A cell phone app that allows you to access and use library services from your phone and see what programs the library offers
        • Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself
        • A cell phone app that helps you locate material within the library by guiding you with GPS
        • E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read
        • A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like movies or your own e-books
        • Classes on how to download e-books to handheld devices
        • Classes or instruction on how to use handheld reading devices like e-book readers and tablet computers 
  • Part 5:  The present and the future of libraries
    • Libraries' strengths
    • What should be libraries' 'guiding principle'?
    • Things to change
    • Library innovations
    • Roadblocks and concerns


Reading & Library Habits in Different Communities.  (Pew Research Center, 12/20/2012)
  • Urban/Suburban/Rural
    • Book readers
    • Device owners
    • Among e-book readers
    • Purposes for reading
    • Library activities
    • Where people get book recommendations


Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.  (Pew Internet, 10/23/2012)
  •  General reading habits
    • Book readers by age (graph)
    • Book formats read in the past year, by age group (graph)
    • E-books beyond e-readers (graph)
    • How e-content has affected younger Americans' reading habits
  • When to borrow, when to buy
    • Thinking about the last book you read, in any format, did you... (graph)
  • Library use
    • Library use in the past year (table)
    • How important is the public library to you and your family?  (graph)
  • How library patrons' habits have changed since they began borrowing e-books
  • Library patrons' experiences with e-book borrowing
    • How they find out about e-books
    • The checkout process
  • Non e-book borrowers

Libraries, patrons, and e-books.  (Pew Internet, 6/22/2012)