Saturday, November 13, 2010

Meet Travis Tranel, Freshman Republican Legislator from Wisconsin's 49th Assembly District

16th in a series.


Wisconsin State Journal 49th Assembly District candidate profiles.

Public libraries in the 49th Assembly District, all of which is located in the Southwest Wisconsin Library System. 
Grant County:  Bloomington, Boscobel, Cassville, Cuba City, Dickeyville, Fennimore, Hazel Green, Lancaster, Livingston, Montfort, Muscoda, Platteville, Potosi.
Lafayette County:  Benton.



Hey Wisconsin! Who Did Your County Vote For?

In the U.S. Senate race.


Racine Public Library Renovation Completed Ahead of Schedule


Link to November 12 Racine Journal-Times article, "Library second floor reopens".

Excerpt:   The area has new carpet, new study rooms, more seating areas, more space for Spanish language materials and the library's collection of local historical materials, and rearranged stacks of books - the fiction and nonfiction sections have traded places.

Related article.
Library's second floor undergoing renovation.  (9/6/2010)

More Community Library Disagreements


Link to November 13 West of the I article, "Library Board president intends to file ethics complaint against Randall supervisor".

Excerpt: Mangold alleges Nolan misrepresented the ages of Library Board members as in their 30s when testifying to a state investigator looking into allegations of age and gender discrimination made by former director Mary Ellen Close. Nolan testified Mangold wanted Close demoted or fired to get younger people aligned with him into board positions.

The board is in fact dominated by people over 40 and several in their 60s, the document dismissing the discrimination charges says
.

Community Library in the news:
Stakeholders agree to postpone to disagree.  (10/22/2010)
DWD Equal Rights Division:  No discrimination on Community Library case.  (10/18/2010)
Need for more space at Twin Lakes/Randall Branch of Community Library.  (8/23/2010)
More disagreements at Community Library.  (5/25/2010)
Maggie Rivals Dewey for Attention.  (5/24/2010)
Board Member Raises Objections to Library Cat.  (5/9/2010)
New Director Hired.  (4/20/2010)
A Library Board Appointment Not According to Hoyle.  (4/13/2010)
Former Library Director Sues for Wages after Firing.  (3/16/2010)
Position Announcement:  Library Executive Director, Community Library, Salem, Wisconsin.  (2/5/2010)
Former Director of Community Library: From Demotion to Dismissal. (1/29/2010)
 Community Library Board Member Wields Machete to Address $1,000 Deficit. (12/06/2009)
New Community Library Representative to Wilmot School Board
. (11/11/2009)
Demoted director to fight for job
. (10/30/2009)
Library Board confirms interim director. (10/27/2009)
Community Library Soap Opera Continues
. (10/23/2009)
Community Library Update: "What we have here is...failure to communicate. (10/09/2009)
Community Library Board of Trustees: Riding Roughshod? (10/01/2009)
Library Board's "Positive Direction" Takes an Immediate Detour. (9/30/2009)
West county library group under fire. (1/29/2009)

Suburban Chicago Police Departments Go From 'Sacred Cows' to 'Ground Chuck'


Link to November 12 Daily Herald article, "Why are towns cutting police officers?"

Excerpt: Once considered sacred cows of municipal budgets, police departments around the Chicago suburbs these days are more akin to ground chuck.

A number of communities are cutting police staffing in an effort to reduce citywide costs. In past years, municipal leaders usually cut evenly throughout all departments. In some cases the cuts were deeper in other departments to spare public safety departments the pain. But not this time.

“Last year we laid off in our public works department,” said Anne Marrin, Prospect Heights city administrator. “But the fact of the matter is police departments, not just in Prospect Heights, are the largest portions of all these budgets.

Meet Amy Loudenbeck, Freshman Republican Legislator from Wisconsin's 45th Assembly District

15th in a series.

A headscratcher of an outcome in the 15th Senate District.  Although Democrats kept the Senate seat, Tim Cullen winning with 59% of the vote, they lost all 3 Assembly seats (43, 44, & 45 Assembly Districts).


Biography

Issues

Public library service areas in the 45th Assembly District, which includes portions of the Arrowhead and Lakeshores library systems.
Rock County:  Beloit, Clinton, Janesville (wards 5, 6, & 12). 

Friends of the Public Library Miami-Dade 10x10 Challenge


Link to November 12 Miami Herald article, "When it comes to generosity, every little bit helps".

Excerpt: As the country's wealthiest seek pledges from their fellow billionaires to use their money for good, many institutions also have programs in place to target those givers who aren't flush with cash.

The 10X10 Challenge, a campaign by Friends of the Miami-Dade Public Library, has a goal of raising $100,000 through $10 donations from 10,000 people. (It recently passed the $10,000 mark.)


Just to reiterate.  (Quotes from the THANK YOU! text box)

We expect to hit the $15,000 mark.

See you again next year!

What happened to the goal of raising $100,000?

The Strong Relationship Between Academic Achievement and Good School Libraries


Link to November 13 letter to the editor of the (Delaware) News Journal.

Excerpt: It was a delight to see school libraries on the front page of the Tuesday News Journal. While many fine points were expressed regarding the value of school librarians, the article fell a bit short of the big picture.

Nothing was mentioned about more than 60 studies (especially those by Keith Curry Lance and Ross Todd) showing the relationship between academic achievement and good school libraries. When one examines the studies, it is clear that three elements are present when enhanced achievement is met: a professional school librarian, sufficient materials and technology (both print and nonprint with maintained/up-to-date equipment) and a collaborative effort and defined achievement plan within the school. When one of these elements is missing, the model limps. It is unfortunate that we have many limping schools in Delaware today
.

Meet Joe Knilans, Freshman Republican Legislator from Wisconsin's 44th Assembly District

14th in a series.

Knilans beat Assembly Speaker Mike Sheridan with 51.5% of the vote.


Biography

Issues

The Janesville Gazette endorsed Mike Sheridan.

The 44th Assembly District is located within the City of Janesville.  (Hedberg Public Library, Arrowhead Library System).

Friday, November 12, 2010

Meet Evan Wynn, Freshman Republican Legislator from Wisconsin's 43rd Assembly District

13th in a series.




The Janesville Gazette endorsed Evan Wynn.

Public libraries in the 43rd Assembly District, which includes portions of the Arrowhead, Lakeshores , Mid-Wisconsin, and South Central library systems.
Jefferson County:  Whitewater.
Rock County:  Edgerton, Milton, Orfordville.

Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library to Lay Off 37 Employees

Don't know how I missed this article, as I've been following IMCPL developments for much of the year.  Thanks to Sylvia for sounding off.


Link to November 5 Indianapolis Star article.

Excerpt: Library patrons will find fewer front-line staff members at Indianapolis branches after the layoffs of 37 employees.

The Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library announced the job cuts Thursday, but they had been expected as part of efforts to close an anticipated $4 million budget shortfall next year.

Still, the prospect of layoffs had library employees on edge for months. Michael Torres, the library workers union president, said the first affected employees were notified late last week.

"We're doing more with less," Torres said. "We're in hopes that public service won't suffer . . . but it's bound to stretch people out. We'll do our best."

The library didn't release a list of affected positions but said in a news release that the cuts affected employees across the management, support and public service staffs; the library also has reorganized its management staff
.

Related articles:
Cuts in library hours, materials budget.  (9/15/2010)
Library announces 26% cut in hours.  (9/14/2010)
Indianapolis resident recommends book to local officials.  (9/6/2010)
Library board votes to include 'shortfall appeal' option.  (9/1/2010)
Library board to consider 'shortfall appeal'.  (8/30/2010)
In close vote, library board cuts hours, staff.  (8/20/2010)
Library grapples with its sustainable future.  (8/16/2010)
Library projects a $7.3 million deficit by 2014.  (7/29/2010)
Library board sez no branch closings in 2011.  (7/15/2010)
Library supporters question Pacers deal. (7/15/2010)
High performance government team report.  (7/11/2010)
Library board delays decision on libraries.  (6/5/2010)
Another big turnout for libraries.  (5/13/2010)
Mayor vows to keep library branches open.  (5/12/2010)
Residents speak up for their libraries.  (5/11/2010)
The neighborhood library as refuge.  (5/2/2010)
Indianapolis Star editorial board keeps library funding issue front and center.  (4/25/2010)
Efficiency experts look for ways to keep branch libraries open.  (4/23/2010)
More than 1400 sign petition to keep Glendale branch open.  (4/20/2010)
Editorial:  Find resources for library.  (4/19/2010)
What's in store for Indianapolis-area libraries?  (4/17/2010)
Indiana Pacers bailout talks continue.  (4/16/2010)
Postscript.  (4/15/2010)
Look what's at the top of Indianapolis's to-do list.  (4/14/2010)
A Challenge to Indianapolis-Marion County:  Stand Up for Libraries.  (4/13/2010)
Library rally caps?  Get real, sez IndyStar editorial.  (4/12/2010)
Will Indianapolis rally for its libraries?  (4/12/2010)
Library considers branch closings.  (4/9/2010)

Better to Plan for a New Library Now Than When the Roof Starts to Leak

Fortunately, a full reading of this editorial leads me to believe the newspaper supports the project. The editorial board's main concerns are with the timing and financial impact of a proposed library/senior center facility.

Link to November 12 Marshfield News-Herald editorial, "Our view: Library, senior center project still needs input".

Excerpt: But it might be a difficult time to propose a new facility, no matter how well-planned it is. In struggling economy, taxpayers without as much disposable income (or maybe even a job) won't be inclined to watch their tax bills climb for a library and senior center. After all, it's not like we have rain leaking in the roof and ruining books.  [Emphasis added.]

The library isn't without challenges, however. Library staff have had to get creative to provide new programs and services for patrons as times and technology have changed. The library lacks a separate children's area, divided to cut down on noise. It's had to carve out space for computers and collections for items like DVDs. Meeting space isn't ideal, and the library wasn't designed for high-technology use. While it's not a bad space, it's not the ideal space for public space that gets so much use. Library use continues to grow, thanks in part to the economy. People looking for jobs or entertainment can find free resources at the library.

Related articles:
Design development in progress.  (11/9/2010)
Community input sought for library improvement plans.  (6/9/2010)

Telephone White Pages Becoming a Thing of the Past

The photo below was taken two years ago.  A closer investigation revealed that probably half of these phone books were more than three years old.

I'll never forget the time I poked around the reference collection of the La Crosse Public Library in the mid-1980s and discovered a phone book from Warren, Pennsylvania (see 'About Me').   Whoa!  That's depth, I thought.  Of course, that was back in the day -- and probably at the tail end of it -- when libraries received phone books at no cost.


Link to November 12 Appleton Post-Crescent article, "Companies yank cord on residential phone books".

Excerpt: Residential phone books, a longtime fixture on kitchen counters, refrigerator tops and junk drawers, are disappearing from the American landscape.

[Not to mention a longtime fixture on library reference shelves.]

Regulators have begun granting telecommunications companies the go-ahead to stop mass-printing residential phone books.

In the past month alone, New York, Florida and Pennsylvania approved Verizon Communications Inc.'s request to quit distributing residential white pages. Residents in Virginia have until Nov. 19 to provide comments on a similar request pending with state regulators.

Telephone companies argue that most consumers now check the Internet rather than flip through pages when they want to reach out and touch someone
.

Has the trend to Google everything affected your library's approach to this particular aspect of reference collection development?  How much have you cut back in, say, the past 10 years?


We don't answer our landline, as it's rarely anyone we know.  Yeah, I know, get rid of it.  The task has somehow ended up on our procrastinator's to-do list.

Schools Meet the Challenges of Veterans Transitioning to Campus Life


Link to November 12 Appleton Post-Crescent article, "Veterans find difficulties in transition to campus life".

Excerpt: The Post 9/11 GI Bill helps thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans enroll in college, but the transition from battlefield to lecture hall is often formidable.

"I came back to school and I was like a deer in headlights," said Matt Knorr, 27, a banking and finance student at Fox Valley Technical College who served three tours of duty in Iraq from 2003 to 2005.

"When I got out, I didn't know anybody," he said. "I spent a lot of time at tables by myself and I didn't connect with anybody. It was hard to adjust back to that life."

Since the new GI Bill took effect in August 2009, more than 300,000 recent veterans have enrolled at colleges and universities across the country, presenting administrators and counselors with a unique set of challenges.

"We've started to create a recognition of our veterans," said Vicky Barke, student life director at FVTC, which enrolls nearly 450 veterans. "In our enrollment services area, we have signage that says 'Veterans' Office' so they know that when they come here we have a place for them to find out about their benefits."



Meet Tom Tiffany, Freshman Republican Legislator from Wisconsin's 35th Assembly District

12th in a series.

No content on this site may be reused in any fashion without written permission from TomTiffanyforAssembly.com.

OK, let's check out some alternative sources of information.



The 35th Assembly District is located within the Wisconsin Valley Library Service and includes public libraries in the following communities:
Langlade County:  Antigo (including the Elcho branch).
Lincoln County:  Merrill (T. B. Scott), Tomahawk.
Marathon County:  Marathon County Public Library (Athens branch).

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Meet Chris Kapenga, Freshman Republican Legislator from WIsconsin's 33rd Assembly District

11th in a series.

Chris ran unopposed in the November election.


While watching Dan's YouTube video, I heard a statement that is a regular talking point among Republicans.  "For the first time in history, the state of Wisconsin employs more people in government than it does in manufacturing."

Let's take a look at the latest Wisconsin Labor Force Summary statistics.

Looks like we're not quite there yet.  And when it does come to pass, I'd suggest rewording the statement to read, "For the first time in history, Wisconsin employs more people in federal, state, and local government than it does in manufacturing."


Two Waukesha County public libraries (Delafield, Hartland) are located in the 33rd Assembly District.  It looks as though the district also includes portions of the Mukwanago and Waukesha library service areas.

Books and More at the Poynette Public Library


Link to November 4 Poynette Press article by Mary Jo Borchardt, "The library's newest patron".

Excerpt: How can I fully express our collective love for the library? They had me at 'free books.' It's, of course, a literary all-you-can-eat smorgasbord, making it possible for me to locate and place on hold no less than 40 children's Halloween books last week. Forty. For free, or a few bucks here and there in overdue fines, which I happily write off as a cost of doing business.

Lest I come across as a glutton, I must go on to say that the library has given us so much more than books. When we moved to the area three years ago, we lamented the fact that we were neither a school-bound nor church-going family, the most common avenues to meet people when you're new in town. Young Isadora and I set off for the library with hopes that there we might find a spot to mingle within the community.

We discovered toddler story time and attended almost religiously. Through story time, I caught wind of a new group for knitters that was just beginning to meet weekly at the library. I knit! So I went, not knowing what to expect. To my great surprise, I found that I wasn't alone here at all - there were all kinds of fantastic women with common interests. A year later, it was this same group of women, my dear Knitting Friends, who showered our home with unbelievably delicious home-cooked meals after the birth of our son, Errol.

Really, Library - you had me at free books. Finding these friends (in town!) was so much more than I bargained for
.

Report: Exploring the Digital Nation (Highlights and Link)

LINK to 68-page report. 


Appleton: Materials Review Committee's Decision Won't Be Appealed


Link to November 11 Appleton Post-Crescent article, "Appleton mom Linda Hash won't appeal school ruling on book".

Excerpt:   The young adult novel "The Body of Christopher Creed" will remain a part of Appleton Area School District's ninth-grade communication arts curriculum.

Linda Hash, an Appleton East High School parent who had challenged the book by Carol Plum-Ucci as inappropriate for that age group, said she will not appeal School Supt. Lee Allinger's decision to support a material review panel's recommendation to take no removal action.

"It's my understanding an appeal can be made only on procedural grounds and the legality," Hash said. "So there's really not a whole of lot of point in proceeding any further
."

Related articles:
Materials review committee supports use of book in curriculum.  (10/26/2010)
Parent challenges uses of 'The Body of Christopher Creed' in freshman curriculum.  (10/23/2010)

Budget Marathon in Appleton


Link to November 11 Appleton Post-Crescent article, "Appleton taxes to increase slightly".

Excerpt:   A drawn-out battle over suggested cuts approaching $600,000 from a $146 million spending plan was testy at times and continued long into the night.

By the time the Common Council reached a budget agreement — about 2:25 a.m. Thursday — nearly seven and a half hours after members began deliberating, little had changed from Mayor Tim Hanna’s 714-page plan
.

[snip]

The council took aim at health insurance benefits, long deemed generous compared to those in the private sector. On a 9-7 vote, the council approved increasing nonunion workers’ premium contributions by a greater amount than what Hanna sought. The move primarily affects managers and library staff, but is being sent as a signal to union workers that similar concessions will be sought when contracts expire at the end of the year.

Related articles:
Mayor presents 2011 budget.  (10/7/2010)
Mayor proposes city reorganization plan to address budget deficit.  (9/16/2010)

Meet Tyler August, Freshman Republican Legislator from Wisconsin's 32nd Assembly District

10th in a series.


Public libraries in the 32nd Assembly District, which includes portions of Lakeshores and Kenosha County libraries systems.  (Just the Town of Wheatland in the latter case.)
Walworth County:  Darien, Delavan (Aram), Genoa City, Lake Geneva, Sharon (Brigham Memorial), Walworth, Williams Bay (Barrett Memorial).